General Assignment

R&D Debuts New Look

Feb 5, 2013
Molly Solomon
Molly Solomon

Interisland Terminal’s R&D rung in the new year with a big renovation. HPR’s Molly Solomon caught a preview of the remodeled space and has this report.

You can see the new space for yourself at R&D’s re-launch party. It takes place tonight at 6:30 and you can buy tickets to the event or submit a donation.

www.breadsbybreadshop.com
www.breadsbybreadshop.com

In the land where every plate lunch comes with two scoops of rice, a local baker is going against the grain.

Chris Sy is the man behind Breadshop, a new pop up bakery that sells French country-style loaves. Sy has spent his career working at some of the country's most renowned restaurants, including The French Laundry and Alinea.

Flickr / hawaii
Flickr / hawaii

This holiday season, many families will gather to celebrate the Japanese New Year's tradition of making mochi. You can pick up fresh or frozen mochi from many stores around the state at this time of year. But there's something special about making it the old fashioned way.

Dan Nakasone
Dan Nakasone

Leeward Community College is hosting a very special dinner tonight, “Earth to Plate.” All dishes are created by student chefs and highlight local ingredients from local farms. The benefit dinner is part of the Culinary Arts Program.    “Earth to Plate” serves up a five-course dinner tonight at The Pearl at Leeward Community College. For more information on tonight’s event, call 455-0298.

Flickr/ bump
Flickr / bump

If you're a fan of all thing poi ... head on down to the 3rd Annual Kalo Festival this weekend! Organizers invite the community to learn more about the cultural and historical significance of this staple crop.

Daniel Anthony is a local kalo farmer who believe it's important to continue farming traditional crops such as taro. He'll be at the festival this weekend leading a community taro-ponding workshop.

Barbeque spare ribs. Oxtail Soup. Onolicious chicken? Not exactly what comes to mind when you think politics. Unless you reside in Hawai'i, where politicians have been passing out free recipe pamphlets for years. Local political analyst Dan Boylan stresses the link between food and politics in Hawai'i. Boylan notes that in recent years he’s seen fewer cookbooks.  But occasionally one will pop up in his mailbox.  A candidate who still uses the recipe book approach is Lei Ahu Isa, who served in the Hawai'i House of Representatives from 1996 – 2002.

Flickr / Ann Douglas
Flickr / Ann Douglas

In the last presidential election, Hawaii’s voter turnout was the worst in the nation.  This concerns James Koshiba, the Executive Director of Kanu Hawaii. He wants to bring the people’s voice back into politics.  His project, HawaiiCandidates.info, seeks to re-engage the community and increase voter turnout. Thanks to a largely volunteer effort, Koshiba was able to reach people in communities with historically low voter turnout.  Koshiba’s approach was to listen and ask the community what was important to them.

Home of the Brave
Home of the Brave


Two local graphic novelists are working on an unusual project to raise awareness about human trafficking. Spencer Toyama and Jon Lewis start their book "Home of the Brave" with a protagonist who is sold into slavery. They say they were influenced by the work of Kathy Xian, Executive Director of the Honolulu non-profit The Pacific Alliance to Stop Slavery.

Flickr / Joel Abroad
Flickr / Joel Abroad

Club Hubba Hubba. The name conjures up the bawdy glitter of the 1940s nightlife of downtown Honolulu's Hotel Street.

Now the building that housed the historic club is being renovated and so is the former strip joint's neon sign. One of the few remaining signs of that era in the city, it was set to be lit up this weekend, but may be delayed a week or two.

Eric Yanagi

Nearly 40 years ago, a 22-year old artist decided to document the changing landscape of Honolulu's most famous neighborhood --- Waikiki.  That artist was local photographer Eric Yanagi.  

Thanks to a state grant, Yanagi completed the year-long project in 1973. His focus was on the community that was living in a rapidly developing Waikiki.  Now he’s compiled a collection of his photographs that are on display at UH Manoa, “Framing Paradise: Photography and Waikiki.”

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