Jackie Young

Host, Weekend Edition

Jackie Young is no stranger to radio or the media, having worked in radio promotions at KGMB Radio during high school, and also as a board operator and in news with some the original HPR team in the mid-80s. She's also been a DJ at most of the other radio stations in Honolulu. Jackie has been a freelance writer since 2007, and has also been involved in acting and TV for many years. She is a graduate of Punahou School and the University of Hawaiʻi.

See her story on ʻUkulele History.

Ways to Connect

Jackie Young
Jackie Young

Oʻahu’s largest food pantry is being forced out of its current location. Feeding Hawaiʻi Together serves as a lifeline for about 2-thousand needy people each week—providing food and household goods.  But right now, the nonprofit is in trouble.  HPR contributing reporter Jackie Young has more on the challenges facing Feeding Hawaiʻi Together.

Jackie Young
Jackie Young

A neighborhood bookstore in Honolulu’s neighborhood of Mō‘ili‘ili will be closing down soon. It’s been part of the university community for nearly 40 years. The store's manager says it's because of financial pressures--but the enterprise isn't disappearing entirely.  Jackie Young has more on the changing times for a familiar store.

Revolution Books opened in 1976, near Tamashiro Market in Kalihi. Within 2 years, it moved to the university area and has been there ever since—specializing in a wide range of topics, including politics, feminism, religion and the environment.

Wikipedia Commons
Wikipedia Commons

This week we've been looking at part of the legacy of a dozen years of U.S. nuclear testing in the South Pacific.  For survivors of those tests and their descendants, part of the story is medical treatment—and how to pay for it.  In her concluding report, Jackie Young looks at some possible solutions.

Wikipedia Commons
Wikipedia Commons

Hawai‘i 's Department of Human Services projects it will save about 29-million dollars a year by not providing insurance coverage for so-called able-bodied Micronesians of working age.  That group has been shifted to plans under the federal Affordable Care Act.  But healthcare advocates say the economics are more complicated.  Jackie Young has more in her continuing series about the lingering health costs of U.S. nuclear testing in the South Pacific.

Wikipedia Commons
Wikipedia Commons

The rising cost of health care is a concern for all Hawai‘i residents.  But one group in particular is facing added medical expenses.  About 10,000 Micronesians live in Hawai‘i.  They're at the center of an issue dating back to U.S. nuclear testing in the South Pacific.  This week, Jackie Young is taking a closer look at some of that history—and how it impacts us today.