Noe Tanigawa

Arts & Culture Reporter

Noe Tanigawa covers art, culture, and ideas for Hawai'i Public Radio.    Noe began working in news at WQXR, the New York Times' classical station in New York City, where she also hosted music programs from 1990-94.  Prior to New York, Noe was a music host in jazz, rock, urban contemporary, and contemporary and classic Hawaiian music formats in Honolulu.  Since arriving at HPR in 2002, Noe has received awards from the Los Angeles Press Club, the Society of Professional Journalists Hawai'i Chapter, and an Edward R. Murrow Regional Award for coverage of the budget process at the Hawai'i State Legislature. Noe holds a Masters in Painting from UH Mānoa. She maintains an active painting practice, and has recently returned from a 2015 residency with the U.S. Art in Embassies program in Palau.  Noe is from Wailupe Valley in East O'ahu.

Ways to Connect

  Gerald Clayton is a composer and pianist making waves in diverse music circles.    A Presidential Scholar in the Arts, Clayton recently won the Edison award for best international jazz album and the New York Times hails his "huge, authoritative presence" onstage.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa spoke with him as he prepares for a concert in Honolulu.

Discussions about food in Hawai’i often drift to the issue of cost.  In this installment of HPR’s series, “Feeding Ourselves: Hawai’i’s Food Future”, HPR’s Noe Tanigawa looks at what drives the prices we pay.

  Musicians and listeners are singing the praises of a new venue in Honolulu.  Mezz 127 is not easy to find, but HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports, it’s worth the search.

Coming up at Mezz 127 in the Topa Financial Center: 

 Saturday, March 9
7:00—9:30
Jason Gay soprano & tenor saxes, Dean Taba double bass, Noel Okimoto drums

  Namelehuapono is providing a new kind of support to victims of domestic violence.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports on their process of reconnecting women with their culture and with their own inner resources.

Namelehuapono does not have its own website, but some information can be found here.

  UH Manoa researchers are reporting the decline of a native moth that indicates changes in habitat across the island chain.  Thanks to specimens collected over time at the Bishop Museum and the UH Insect Museum, scientists are able to chart changes and possibly propose mitigation efforts.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports.

You can read the full research paper online.

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