Noe Tanigawa

Arts & Culture Reporter

Noe Tanigawa covers art, culture, and ideas for Hawai'i Public Radio.    Noe began working in news at WQXR, the New York Times' classical station in New York City, where she also hosted music programs from 1990-94.  Prior to New York, Noe was a music host in jazz, rock, urban contemporary, and contemporary and classic Hawaiian music formats in Honolulu.  Since arriving at HPR in 2002, Noe has received awards from the Los Angeles Press Club, the Society of Professional Journalists Hawai'i Chapter, and an Edward R. Murrow Regional Award for coverage of the budget process at the Hawai'i State Legislature. Noe holds a Masters in Painting from UH Mānoa. She maintains an active painting practice, and has recently returned from a 2015 residency with the U.S. Art in Embassies program in Palau.  Noe is from Wailupe Valley in East O'ahu.

Ways to Connect

The Conversation: Monday, June 5th, 2017

Jun 5, 2017
Pixabay

2017 Hurricane Season; Public Beach Access Controversy; Red Hill Fuel Tanks

Jill Steinberg
Jill Steinberg

Kevork Mourad does spontaneous painting, live with musicians.  He has performed at major world venues including the Metropolitan Museum, the Liverpool Biennial, and the Paris Art Fair, mixing painting, animation, video and music.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa spoke with him in advance of performances here in Honolulu while he is Artist in Residence at Shangri La.

Asghar Farhadi
Asghar Farhadi

Getting behind the headlines can be a humanizing experience.  That’s what organizers of the Seventh Art Stand screening and discussion series hope will happen when you view their films about Muslim lives around the world.  Named for the seven Muslim countries originally targeted for U.S. immigration and travel restrictions, the Seventh Art Stand experience is being presented in over fifty cities, including Honolulu.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports.

noe tanigawa
noe tanigawa

Ward Warehouse is set to close in August to make way for a luxury high rise project. Many popular shops like Eden in Love and MORI by Art + Flea, will relocate to other Ward properties. HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports Na Mea Hawai‘i/Native Books is having a blast until the closing moment.

noe tanigawa

Pa’i Foundation Gallery at Kālia is an enclave for Native Hawaiian art at the center of the mall level at Ala Moana Center.   They’ve made it easy to catch the MAMo Juried Exhibit of ceramics, glass, paintings, photographs, wearable art, and more.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports.

noe tanigawa
noe tanigawa

The Honolulu Biennial may be over but Maoli Arts Movement, or MAMo activities have picked right up, recognizing Native Hawaiian artists.  This year, Moana Eisele is being honored for her kapa work, along with Umi Kai for his recreations of Hawaiian implements and weaponry.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa caught up with another 2017 MAMo honoree, painter and historian, Brook Parker at Marks Garage, where the three are showing through July 5th.  

Adamu Waziri

Cartoons once dismissed as filler or just for laughs, are big business now.  Animations can shape our view of the world and now, hand in hand with virtual reality and digital gaming, animations are being used to preserve and perpetuate traditional culture.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports.

Kyle Wright, courtesy of PAʻI Foundation
Kyle Wright, courtesy of PAʻI Foundation

Nita Pilago’s Wahine Toa designs were a sell out, again, at the recent Merrie Monarch in Hilo.  Just eight years in, her small Kona company is expanding production in Bali and Pilago has a new line of lava themed pieces planned for the upcoming MAMo Wearable Art Show.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports.

noe tanigawa
noe tanigawa

The 2017 Artists of Hawai‘i exhibition at the Honolulu Museum of Art is more about experience than depiction this year.  Kasey Lindley’s video installation merges technology and play.  Another installation, made of tissue, cloth and thread, burrows into both body and psyche.  Kaori Ukaji spoke to HPR’s Noe Tanigawa about her piece, Serenely  Proliferating.

Kyle Wright, courtesy of PAʻI Foundation.
Kyle Wright, courtesy of PAʻI Foundation.

The Hawaiian word, maoli, means native, or genuine. When Maoli Arts Month started in 2006, its founders focused on three aspects of the vision: a gallery show of Native Hawaiian fine arts, a high fashion wearable art show, and an arts market that could fuel a boom in maoli art production. HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports that eleven years later, opportunities have built capability in the community.

noe tanigawa
noe tanigawa

For those who saw it in 2012, artist Kaili Chun’s twenty four hour pop up installation of fifty 8-foot steel cells on Waimānalo Beach was a testimony to the mute power of art.  Right now, her installation of fishnets at the Honolulu Museum and hundreds of copper fish at the Prince Waikīkī nicely bookend Chun’s ideas about global systems and the importance of place.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports.

noe tanigawa
noe tanigawa

The UH Mānoa Art Gallery is showing a heartening collection of new work by its Bachelor of Fine Arts graduates in graphic design and studio art.  Fun ideas in a range of materials make these shows a must, along with closing festivities for the Honolulu Biennial.

Music of the Spheres

May 3, 2017
peter swanzy
peter swanzy

Maui based Ebb and Flow Arts has challenged and delighted audiences across the state since 1999.  Their performances are known for high level musicianship and novel experiences; they’ve done nearly ninety world premieres.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports there is a free concert coming up in the Hōkūlani Imaginarium in Kāne‘ohe.

noe tanigawa
noe tanigawa

A new gallery on Nu‘uanu Street is adding to the art buzz in Honolulu.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports the Ravizza Brownfield Gallery has opened with a distinctly different mission, one that adds another dimension to Hawai‘i‘s cultural cachet.

noe tanigawa
noe tanigawa

Painter, installation artist, Yayoi Kusama is having her moment in the U.S.  With sold out shows in Los Angeles and Washington D.C., her installation at the IBM Building is a hidden gem of the Honolulu Biennial.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa takes us there.

creative commons
creative commons

People around the nation and world are using development as a community organizing tool.  Change becomes a reason to work with others and improve their neighborhoods.  Now, the UH Mānoa Architecture School is convening designers, government leaders, and community members to inject fresh ideas into Honolulu’s development plans.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports on the Building Voices Symposium and Design Competition set for Earth Day, April 22nd .

HOT
HOT

One of the most popular operas in the entire repertory, Tales of Hoffmann, will close Hawai‘i Opera Theatre’s 2016-17 season.  Live projections and a roster of fine voices mark this all original production, the last with Artistic Director Henry Akina at the helm.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa spoke to him about his tenure in Hawai‘i opera.

Taiji Terasaki
Taiji Terasaki

This year, the Contact Hawai‘i show at the Honolulu Museum of Art School asked artists to envision our islands a thousand years from now.  Some artists came up with post-apocalyptic scenarios, a giant white tiki carving is bound by ropes on the front lawn, while others explored tourism, climate change, relationships, and more.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports on one artist’s vision of Hawai‘i as a bountiful Eden.

Chris Hong
Chris Hong

The UH Athletics Department is looking at ways to energize its area there in the quarry on the Mānoa campus.  They turned to the UH Architecture Department for ideas on how to create a vibrant community feel, stretching from upper campus through lower campus, into the community as a whole.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports on a very special project and the ideas it generated.

Roseanne Barr
Roseanne Barr

Comedian, television personality, Roseanne Barr has been living on Hawai‘i island for the last eight years.  She and her family recently opened a store, Honoka‘a Country Market, selling locally raised Andrade beef and soon, her own nuts, pineapples, and produce.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa caught up with Roseanne ahead of her stand up shows at the Blue Note, Saturday and Sunday.

noe tanigawa
noe tanigawa

People gravitate to Andrew Binkley’s “Stone Cloud” at Foster Garden.  Part of the Honolulu Biennial, it is big, and looks quite heavy, hovering over the heads of those who wander by.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa caught up with Binkley there in the Garden to find out what he had in mind.

noe tanigawa
noe tanigawa

Matthew James combines painting and sculpture in his large three dimensional wall pieces.  You can see several around Honolulu now---the largest is a twenty-one by fifteen foot wall of blue wave patterns on the mauka side of Ala Moana Boulevard, on the Salt complex.  You can also see his work in Italy, Miami, New York City, Manila, Iceland, and other locations.  James left Hawai‘i for New York City seventeen years ago, and HPR’s Noe Tanigawa caught him at his studio in Brooklyn for these reflections.

Melissa Chimera
Melissa Chimera

In just four years, the annual Contact exhibition has become a focal point of art and community at the Honolulu Museum School.  It’s setting a new model with initiatives to assist making ambitious works plus community activities for the whole two week run.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports.

noe tanigawa
noe tanigawa

Not just the art crowd, it’s everybody battling to get into Yayoi Kusama’s infinity Rooms at the Hirshhorn Museum in Washington.  Tickets sell out in minutes, and viewers still have to wait hours for their 20 seconds in each room!  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports eagle eyed art lovers have spotted our own Kusama installation in Honolulu, her pink spotted Footprints of Life, part of the Honolulu Biennial at Foster Garden.

Courtesy of Hawaii Opera Theatre
Courtesy of Hawaii Opera Theatre

Traditional grand opera is comically characterized by big violent scenes and jumping from great heights, but more recently especially, introspective, psychological operas are winning new audiences.  Hawai‘i Opera Theatre’s latest production, Three Decembers, could do just that.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports the production will bring one of opera’s most beloved performers to four Hawaiian Islands.

Making Art Happen

Mar 22, 2017
noe tanigawa
noe tanigawa

Great art does not just happen.  It has to be nurtured to become a rich conversation about this place and time—that’s how it becomes valuable to generations hence.    HPR’s Noe Tanigawa continues a series of reports on how  people and businesses investing in local art are building the way our time will be remembered.

noe tanigawa
noe tanigawa

Master carver Kawika Eskaran has built canoes, he’s sailed and works with Polynesian navigators and directs special projects at BYU-Hawai‘i.  His sculpture at the corner of South and Ala Moana is designed to bring peace to an area with a troubled history.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports, it is also a navigational reference, for those who understand.

Spark! Hiromi

Mar 15, 2017
Hiromi
Hiromi

Award winning pianist Hiromi Uehara has been playing since age six.  A chance meeting in Tokyo with jazz legend Chick Corea set her on a trajectory that took her to number one on the Billboard Jazz Album chart last year.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports Hiromi will be at the Blue Note Waikiki this week, performing her unique combination of jazz, pop and classical music from that album, Spark.

noe tanigawa
noe tanigawa

Honolulu is having an art moment.  The Honolulu Biennial is raising awareness, new construction is providing opportunities, and established businesses are realizing art’s marketing potential.  Without the benefit of traditional galleries, an alternative infrastructure has been preparing artists for this moment.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa traces how choice pieces, many representing Hawai‘i’s  stories and culture, are appearing around town.

noe tanigawa

Art Biennials are big business, as you can tell by the proliferation of bi and triennials around the globe over the last twenty years.  Cities launch these high profile art extravaganzas to attract tourists, sales, and cultural cache.  The Honolulu Biennial has just opened in nine venues around town, HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports on how to make the most of it.

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