Noe Tanigawa

Arts & Culture Reporter

Noe Tanigawa covers art, culture, and ideas for Hawai'i Public Radio.    Noe began working in news at WQXR, the New York Times' classical station in New York City, where she also hosted music programs from 1990-94.  Prior to New York, Noe was a music host in jazz, rock, urban contemporary, and contemporary and classic Hawaiian music formats in Honolulu.  Since arriving at HPR in 2002, Noe has received awards from the Los Angeles Press Club, the Society of Professional Journalists Hawai'i Chapter, and an Edward R. Murrow Regional Award for coverage of the budget process at the Hawai'i State Legislature. Noe holds a Masters in Painting from UH Mānoa. She maintains an active painting practice, and has recently returned from a 2015 residency with the U.S. Art in Embassies program in Palau.  Noe is from Wailupe Valley in East O'ahu.

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Music of the Spheres

May 3, 2017
peter swanzy
peter swanzy

Maui based Ebb and Flow Arts has challenged and delighted audiences across the state since 1999.  Their performances are known for high level musicianship and novel experiences; they’ve done nearly ninety world premieres.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports there is a free concert coming up in the Hōkūlani Imaginarium in Kāne‘ohe.

noe tanigawa
noe tanigawa

A new gallery on Nu‘uanu Street is adding to the art buzz in Honolulu.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports the Ravizza Brownfield Gallery has opened with a distinctly different mission, one that adds another dimension to Hawai‘i‘s cultural cachet.

noe tanigawa
noe tanigawa

Painter, installation artist, Yayoi Kusama is having her moment in the U.S.  With sold out shows in Los Angeles and Washington D.C., her installation at the IBM Building is a hidden gem of the Honolulu Biennial.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa takes us there.

creative commons
creative commons

People around the nation and world are using development as a community organizing tool.  Change becomes a reason to work with others and improve their neighborhoods.  Now, the UH Mānoa Architecture School is convening designers, government leaders, and community members to inject fresh ideas into Honolulu’s development plans.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports on the Building Voices Symposium and Design Competition set for Earth Day, April 22nd .

HOT
HOT

One of the most popular operas in the entire repertory, Tales of Hoffmann, will close Hawai‘i Opera Theatre’s 2016-17 season.  Live projections and a roster of fine voices mark this all original production, the last with Artistic Director Henry Akina at the helm.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa spoke to him about his tenure in Hawai‘i opera.

Taiji Terasaki
Taiji Terasaki

This year, the Contact Hawai‘i show at the Honolulu Museum of Art School asked artists to envision our islands a thousand years from now.  Some artists came up with post-apocalyptic scenarios, a giant white tiki carving is bound by ropes on the front lawn, while others explored tourism, climate change, relationships, and more.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports on one artist’s vision of Hawai‘i as a bountiful Eden.

Chris Hong
Chris Hong

The UH Athletics Department is looking at ways to energize its area there in the quarry on the Mānoa campus.  They turned to the UH Architecture Department for ideas on how to create a vibrant community feel, stretching from upper campus through lower campus, into the community as a whole.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports on a very special project and the ideas it generated.

Roseanne Barr
Roseanne Barr

Comedian, television personality, Roseanne Barr has been living on Hawai‘i island for the last eight years.  She and her family recently opened a store, Honoka‘a Country Market, selling locally raised Andrade beef and soon, her own nuts, pineapples, and produce.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa caught up with Roseanne ahead of her stand up shows at the Blue Note, Saturday and Sunday.

noe tanigawa
noe tanigawa

People gravitate to Andrew Binkley’s “Stone Cloud” at Foster Garden.  Part of the Honolulu Biennial, it is big, and looks quite heavy, hovering over the heads of those who wander by.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa caught up with Binkley there in the Garden to find out what he had in mind.

noe tanigawa
noe tanigawa

Matthew James combines painting and sculpture in his large three dimensional wall pieces.  You can see several around Honolulu now---the largest is a twenty-one by fifteen foot wall of blue wave patterns on the mauka side of Ala Moana Boulevard, on the Salt complex.  You can also see his work in Italy, Miami, New York City, Manila, Iceland, and other locations.  James left Hawai‘i for New York City seventeen years ago, and HPR’s Noe Tanigawa caught him at his studio in Brooklyn for these reflections.

Melissa Chimera
Melissa Chimera

In just four years, the annual Contact exhibition has become a focal point of art and community at the Honolulu Museum School.  It’s setting a new model with initiatives to assist making ambitious works plus community activities for the whole two week run.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports.

noe tanigawa
noe tanigawa

Not just the art crowd, it’s everybody battling to get into Yayoi Kusama’s infinity Rooms at the Hirshhorn Museum in Washington.  Tickets sell out in minutes, and viewers still have to wait hours for their 20 seconds in each room!  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports eagle eyed art lovers have spotted our own Kusama installation in Honolulu, her pink spotted Footprints of Life, part of the Honolulu Biennial at Foster Garden.

Courtesy of Hawaii Opera Theatre
Courtesy of Hawaii Opera Theatre

Traditional grand opera is comically characterized by big violent scenes and jumping from great heights, but more recently especially, introspective, psychological operas are winning new audiences.  Hawai‘i Opera Theatre’s latest production, Three Decembers, could do just that.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports the production will bring one of opera’s most beloved performers to four Hawaiian Islands.

Making Art Happen

Mar 22, 2017
noe tanigawa
noe tanigawa

Great art does not just happen.  It has to be nurtured to become a rich conversation about this place and time—that’s how it becomes valuable to generations hence.    HPR’s Noe Tanigawa continues a series of reports on how  people and businesses investing in local art are building the way our time will be remembered.

noe tanigawa
noe tanigawa

Master carver Kawika Eskaran has built canoes, he’s sailed and works with Polynesian navigators and directs special projects at BYU-Hawai‘i.  His sculpture at the corner of South and Ala Moana is designed to bring peace to an area with a troubled history.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports, it is also a navigational reference, for those who understand.

Spark! Hiromi

Mar 15, 2017
Hiromi
Hiromi

Award winning pianist Hiromi Uehara has been playing since age six.  A chance meeting in Tokyo with jazz legend Chick Corea set her on a trajectory that took her to number one on the Billboard Jazz Album chart last year.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports Hiromi will be at the Blue Note Waikiki this week, performing her unique combination of jazz, pop and classical music from that album, Spark.

noe tanigawa
noe tanigawa

Honolulu is having an art moment.  The Honolulu Biennial is raising awareness, new construction is providing opportunities, and established businesses are realizing art’s marketing potential.  Without the benefit of traditional galleries, an alternative infrastructure has been preparing artists for this moment.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa traces how choice pieces, many representing Hawai‘i’s  stories and culture, are appearing around town.

noe tanigawa

Art Biennials are big business, as you can tell by the proliferation of bi and triennials around the globe over the last twenty years.  Cities launch these high profile art extravaganzas to attract tourists, sales, and cultural cache.  The Honolulu Biennial has just opened in nine venues around town, HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports on how to make the most of it.

noe tanigawa
noe tanigawa

Amidst the flurry of Executive Orders issued recently by President Trump, a seventy five year old Order is being re-examined.  Executive Order 9066 by President Roosevelt in 1942, banned “any or all persons” from “military areas” as determined by the Secretary of War and military commanders.  Though this order and the Japanese internment it caused have been discredited in the courts, political figures have used it recently to support new rules around immigration.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports on what is at stake.

creative commons
creative commons

No one person decided the rail system Honolulu is currently embarked on.  In 2008, 50.6% of voters decided to allow the construction of a steel on steel rail transit system.  There were expert panels, studies, reports, and key City Council decisions, which were shaped by input.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa talked with former Mayor Mufi Hannemann who was spearheading the rail project at the time.  It was pegged at 5.2 billion dollars.

Creative Commons
Creative Commons

  There were a few key junctures in the long, convoluted story of Honolulu’s rail project.  Getting the point five percent general excise tax increase was one, and the decision to go with an elevated system is another.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa is taking an average citizen’s look at the project and had a chance to talk with two key players involved in the project’s beginnings.

creative commons
creative commons

noe tanigawa
noe tanigawa

Setting the record straight matters to some people, like Honolulu newscaster Joe Moore.  Moore, a well-known Mozart aficionado, has been tracking the true story of Antonio Salieri, depicted as Mozart’s nemesis in a popular film about Mozart’s life.  In the process, Moore uncovered a treasure trove of music, now brought back to life in two special concerts featuring the Spring Wind Octet.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports.

creative commons
creative commons

TheBus, Honolulu’s bus transit system, is the only mass transit system to be honored twice by the American Public Transportation Association, the Oscars of mass transit.  TheBus is also credited with the lowest cost per mile of any U.S. system.  No wonder so many people today wonder why Bus Rapid Transit, BRT, cannot be expanded to address O‘ahu’s traffic mess.  Honolulu’s current bus network was developed during the Harris administration under Transportation Services Director, Cheryl Soon.

creative commons
creative commons

 

Ronen Zilberman
Ronen Zilberman

When Tennessee Williams’ play, A Streetcar Named Desire, debuted in New York in 1951, the Times’ theater critic called it, “a quietly woven study of intangibles.”  In the years since, the play has become a film and an opera, and it still is an unvarnished look at what can happen to innocence.   HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports on the opera by Andre Previn, opening amidst great anticipation this week in Honolulu. 

noe tanigawa
noe tanigawa

Worldwide, over two million people participated in Women’s Marches on Saturday, concerned about U.S. positions on climate change, immigration, healthcare, reproductive rights, the world community, and more.  Here in Hawai‘i, an estimated five thousand on Maui, an equal number on Hawai‘i Island, two thousand on Kaua‘i and eight thousand more in Honolulu took the opportunity to air a diversity of concerns.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa offers this sampling from the colorful Women’s March in Honolulu.

noe tanigawa
noe tanigawa

Nearly a hundred twenty nine thousand people voted for Donald Trump in Hawai‘i, and this morning, Hawai‘i Republicans convened at Ward Big City Diner to watch and celebrate the inauguration together.   President Trump’s inauguration is prompting other gatherings, including a teach in at UH Manoa today, a community concert tonight, and the international Women’s March tomorrow, now with over 600 sister marches world- wide.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports.

noe tanigawa
noe tanigawa

  This year, for Hawai‘i’s celebration of Reverend Martin Luther King’s holiday there was a  Run for Peace on Maui, a commemorative walk happened on Kaua‘i, and Hawai‘i island celebrated in Kona on Sunday.  In Honolulu, HPR’s Noe Tanigawa spoke with some of the millennials in attendance at what is called the annual "People's Parade." 

Women's March
Women's March

In November, a Facebook post from Maui ignited what is becoming the largest demonstration linked to President-elect Trump’s inauguration.  On January 21st, Mr. Trump’s first day in office, Women's March demonstrations are scheduled in every state and in thirty three countries around the world, with participation now nearing six hundred thousand people.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports sister marches are being organized on Kaua‘i, O‘ahu, Maui, and Hawai‘i island. 

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