Noe Tanigawa

Arts & Culture Reporter

Noe Tanigawa covers art, culture, and ideas for Hawai'i Public Radio.    Noe began working in news at WQXR, the New York Times' classical station in New York City, where she also hosted music programs from 1990-94.  Prior to New York, Noe was a music host in jazz, rock, urban contemporary, and contemporary and classic Hawaiian music formats in Honolulu.  Since arriving at HPR in 2002, Noe has received awards from the Los Angeles Press Club, the Society of Professional Journalists Hawai'i Chapter, and an Edward R. Murrow Regional Award for coverage of the budget process at the Hawai'i State Legislature. Noe holds a Masters in Painting from UH Mānoa. She maintains an active painting practice, and has recently returned from a 2015 residency with the U.S. Art in Embassies program in Palau.  Noe is from Wailupe Valley in East O'ahu.

Ways to Connect

Spark! Hiromi

Mar 15, 2017
Hiromi
Hiromi

Award winning pianist Hiromi Uehara has been playing since age six.  A chance meeting in Tokyo with jazz legend Chick Corea set her on a trajectory that took her to number one on the Billboard Jazz Album chart last year.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports Hiromi will be at the Blue Note Waikiki this week, performing her unique combination of jazz, pop and classical music from that album, Spark.

noe tanigawa
noe tanigawa

Honolulu is having an art moment.  The Honolulu Biennial is raising awareness, new construction is providing opportunities, and established businesses are realizing art’s marketing potential.  Without the benefit of traditional galleries, an alternative infrastructure has been preparing artists for this moment.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa traces how choice pieces, many representing Hawai‘i’s  stories and culture, are appearing around town.

noe tanigawa

Art Biennials are big business, as you can tell by the proliferation of bi and triennials around the globe over the last twenty years.  Cities launch these high profile art extravaganzas to attract tourists, sales, and cultural cache.  The Honolulu Biennial has just opened in nine venues around town, HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports on how to make the most of it.

noe tanigawa
noe tanigawa

Amidst the flurry of Executive Orders issued recently by President Trump, a seventy five year old Order is being re-examined.  Executive Order 9066 by President Roosevelt in 1942, banned “any or all persons” from “military areas” as determined by the Secretary of War and military commanders.  Though this order and the Japanese internment it caused have been discredited in the courts, political figures have used it recently to support new rules around immigration.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports on what is at stake.

creative commons
creative commons

No one person decided the rail system Honolulu is currently embarked on.  In 2008, 50.6% of voters decided to allow the construction of a steel on steel rail transit system.  There were expert panels, studies, reports, and key City Council decisions, which were shaped by input.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa talked with former Mayor Mufi Hannemann who was spearheading the rail project at the time.  It was pegged at 5.2 billion dollars.

Creative Commons
Creative Commons

  There were a few key junctures in the long, convoluted story of Honolulu’s rail project.  Getting the point five percent general excise tax increase was one, and the decision to go with an elevated system is another.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa is taking an average citizen’s look at the project and had a chance to talk with two key players involved in the project’s beginnings.

creative commons
creative commons

noe tanigawa
noe tanigawa

Setting the record straight matters to some people, like Honolulu newscaster Joe Moore.  Moore, a well-known Mozart aficionado, has been tracking the true story of Antonio Salieri, depicted as Mozart’s nemesis in a popular film about Mozart’s life.  In the process, Moore uncovered a treasure trove of music, now brought back to life in two special concerts featuring the Spring Wind Octet.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports.

creative commons
creative commons

TheBus, Honolulu’s bus transit system, is the only mass transit system to be honored twice by the American Public Transportation Association, the Oscars of mass transit.  TheBus is also credited with the lowest cost per mile of any U.S. system.  No wonder so many people today wonder why Bus Rapid Transit, BRT, cannot be expanded to address O‘ahu’s traffic mess.  Honolulu’s current bus network was developed during the Harris administration under Transportation Services Director, Cheryl Soon.

creative commons
creative commons

 

Ronen Zilberman
Ronen Zilberman

When Tennessee Williams’ play, A Streetcar Named Desire, debuted in New York in 1951, the Times’ theater critic called it, “a quietly woven study of intangibles.”  In the years since, the play has become a film and an opera, and it still is an unvarnished look at what can happen to innocence.   HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports on the opera by Andre Previn, opening amidst great anticipation this week in Honolulu. 

noe tanigawa
noe tanigawa

Worldwide, over two million people participated in Women’s Marches on Saturday, concerned about U.S. positions on climate change, immigration, healthcare, reproductive rights, the world community, and more.  Here in Hawai‘i, an estimated five thousand on Maui, an equal number on Hawai‘i Island, two thousand on Kaua‘i and eight thousand more in Honolulu took the opportunity to air a diversity of concerns.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa offers this sampling from the colorful Women’s March in Honolulu.

noe tanigawa
noe tanigawa

Nearly a hundred twenty nine thousand people voted for Donald Trump in Hawai‘i, and this morning, Hawai‘i Republicans convened at Ward Big City Diner to watch and celebrate the inauguration together.   President Trump’s inauguration is prompting other gatherings, including a teach in at UH Manoa today, a community concert tonight, and the international Women’s March tomorrow, now with over 600 sister marches world- wide.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports.

noe tanigawa
noe tanigawa

  This year, for Hawai‘i’s celebration of Reverend Martin Luther King’s holiday there was a  Run for Peace on Maui, a commemorative walk happened on Kaua‘i, and Hawai‘i island celebrated in Kona on Sunday.  In Honolulu, HPR’s Noe Tanigawa spoke with some of the millennials in attendance at what is called the annual "People's Parade." 

Women's March
Women's March

In November, a Facebook post from Maui ignited what is becoming the largest demonstration linked to President-elect Trump’s inauguration.  On January 21st, Mr. Trump’s first day in office, Women's March demonstrations are scheduled in every state and in thirty three countries around the world, with participation now nearing six hundred thousand people.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports sister marches are being organized on Kaua‘i, O‘ahu, Maui, and Hawai‘i island. 

Noe Tanigawa
Noe Tanigawa

When legendary promoter, Tom Moffatt, passed last month, eyes turned to the team at Bamp Project as the most likely successors in the very important task of booking Hawai‘i’s entertainment offerings.  If that’s the case, the guys at Bamp say they have several decades ahead to prove themselves.  Meanwhile, HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports there’s quality and diversity so far in the 2017 line up.

IngeNude
IngeNude

There are over two hundred Fringe Festivals all over the globe, and now O‘ahu and Maui’s festivals are joining the tribe.  “Fringe” festivals are known for the performing arts, they’re uncensored, original, easy to participate in and easy to attend because they use neighborhood venues.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports.

Kealoha Wong
Kealoha Wong

Hawai‘i Slam, a monthly spoken word poetry competition, has been happening since 2003.  It’s considered the largest poetry slam in the world, attracting 500 plus people at its peak  This year, Hawai‘i's team placed second in the National Poetry Slam competition.  You'll find enthusiastic crowds regularly at the First Thursday slams at Hawaiian Brian’s, and Noe Tanigawa reports you may be surprised by what you hear.

imagicity
imagicity

Most people assume that robots, artificial intelligence and technology will play major roles in our future, but have you really thought about their implications for society?  Futurist James Dator contends we are already half way into changes that may make working for a living obsolete.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports.  

Noe Tanigawa
Noe Tanigawa

Photographs of downtown Honolulu on December 7th, 1941, show Christmas lights festooned overhead all up and down Fort Street.  Stores like Liberty House and the Ritz prided themselves on creating window displays like those celebrated holiday highlights in New York City.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports some Chinatown businesses are re-igniting the tradition through New Year’s Eve.

noe tanigawa
noe tanigawa

This time of year, you can feel Honolulu’s major roadways clogging up from late afternoon.  As the pau  hana traffic mounts today, a few dozen people will head to an oasis of calm at St. Peter’s Episcopal Church on Queen Emma street downtown.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports on Jazz Vespers that happen every Thursday at St. Peter’s, starting at 6 in the evening.

Noe Tanigawa
Noe Tanigawa

Hawai‘i has a strong clay culture, and much of it is community based.  The Hawai‘i Potters’ Guild, the Volcano Village Artists, Hui No‘eau, the Lāna‘i Arts Center, and Kaua‘i Community College all play crucial roles keeping ceramics alive on their respective islands.  Recently, the Moloka‘i Arts Center jumped in too, for people love to work with clay.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports on the first statewide juried ceramics exhibition.

noe tanigawa
noe tanigawa

It’s absolutely true that some of the best things about the holidays are free.  You can prove it to yourself and your family by taking a spin around O‘ahu to take in the lights.

noe tanigawa
noe tanigawa

“Go for Broke” was the motto of the 442 Regimental Combat Team.  It was a spirit that changed the minds of Americans as they watched ethnic Japanese fight and die for the United States, even while their relatives were stripped of possessions and thrown into camps.  Over forty years later, President Reagan signed legislation that admitted "race prejudice, war hysteria, and a failure of political leadership" caused the internment.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports on the legacy we all share from this experience.

Face of the Enemy

Dec 6, 2016
United States War Department (United States National Archives) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons
United States War Department (United States National Archives) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

When Japan bombed Pearl Harbor seventy five years ago, thirty seven percent of Hawai‘i’s population was ethnically Japanese.  Honolulu hummed with Japanese run restaurants, sundry stores, hardware and grocery stores, everyone went to Japanese movies, and Japanese maids and gardeners worked in many wealthy homes.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports on how Japanese and others felt during the period.

U.S. National Archives
U.S. National Archives

The bombing of Pearl Harbor was a turning point for Hawai‘i, but it was also the culmination of decades of militarization on O‘ahu.  At the same time, ethnic Japanese constituted forty percent of Hawai‘i’s population, a fact not lost on Washington, as Japanese armies spread across China and the Pacific.

noe tanigawa
noe tanigawa

Rain, in old Hawai‘i, was celebrated in its myriad forms, passing mists to drenching downpours, different in each village and valley.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa spoke with a scholar and kumu hula whose book on Hawaiian rain names opens new vistas in the natural world.

noe tanigawa
noe tanigawa

In 2013, scholars and linguists worldwide were stunned by the discovery of a new indigenous language in Hawai‘i.  Hawai‘i Sign Language was the first new language discovered in the U.S. since the 1930’s.  There are about seven thousand spoken languages in the world, half of which are expected to be lost in the next fifty years.  An even more dire fate could await existing sign languages.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports on efforts to preserve Hawai‘i Sign and its unique view of the world.

noe tanigawa
noe tanigawa

“Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world; indeed, it's the only thing that ever has.”  When Margaret Mead said that, she could have been talking about a lot of community groups, including the small, hard working team that has kept the ARTS at Marks Garage alive for fifteen years now.   HPR's Noe Tanigawa reports.

Bliss Lau/Jasmine Takanikos
Bliss Lau/Jasmine Takanikos

Today, everyone who uses social media is, in effect, creating an image and a brand; activities that used to be the domain of advertising agencies.  As new media platforms evolve, the old advertising models are falling away, reflecting personal and societal changes both in habits and attitudes. 

Pages