Noe Tanigawa

Arts & Culture Reporter

Noe Tanigawa covers art, culture, and ideas for Hawai'i Public Radio.    Noe began working in news at WQXR, the New York Times' classical station in New York City, where she also hosted music programs from 1990-94.  Prior to New York, Noe was a music host in jazz, rock, urban contemporary, and contemporary and classic Hawaiian music formats in Honolulu.  Since arriving at HPR in 2002, Noe has received awards from the Los Angeles Press Club, the Society of Professional Journalists Hawai'i Chapter, and an Edward R. Murrow Regional Award for coverage of the budget process at the Hawai'i State Legislature. Noe holds a Masters in Painting from UH Mānoa. She maintains an active painting practice, and has recently returned from a 2015 residency with the U.S. Art in Embassies program in Palau.  Noe is from Wailupe Valley in East O'ahu.

Ways to Connect

Noe Tanigawa
Noe Tanigawa

When legendary promoter, Tom Moffatt, passed last month, eyes turned to the team at Bamp Project as the most likely successors in the very important task of booking Hawai‘i’s entertainment offerings.  If that’s the case, the guys at Bamp say they have several decades ahead to prove themselves.  Meanwhile, HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports there’s quality and diversity so far in the 2017 line up.

IngeNude
IngeNude

There are over two hundred Fringe Festivals all over the globe, and now O‘ahu and Maui’s festivals are joining the tribe.  “Fringe” festivals are known for the performing arts, they’re uncensored, original, easy to participate in and easy to attend because they use neighborhood venues.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports.

Kealoha Wong
Kealoha Wong

Hawai‘i Slam, a monthly spoken word poetry competition, has been happening since 2003.  It’s considered the largest poetry slam in the world, attracting 500 plus people at its peak  This year, Hawai‘i's team placed second in the National Poetry Slam competition.  You'll find enthusiastic crowds regularly at the First Thursday slams at Hawaiian Brian’s, and Noe Tanigawa reports you may be surprised by what you hear.

imagicity
imagicity

Most people assume that robots, artificial intelligence and technology will play major roles in our future, but have you really thought about their implications for society?  Futurist James Dator contends we are already half way into changes that may make working for a living obsolete.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports.  

Noe Tanigawa
Noe Tanigawa

Photographs of downtown Honolulu on December 7th, 1941, show Christmas lights festooned overhead all up and down Fort Street.  Stores like Liberty House and the Ritz prided themselves on creating window displays like those celebrated holiday highlights in New York City.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports some Chinatown businesses are re-igniting the tradition through New Year’s Eve.

noe tanigawa
noe tanigawa

This time of year, you can feel Honolulu’s major roadways clogging up from late afternoon.  As the pau  hana traffic mounts today, a few dozen people will head to an oasis of calm at St. Peter’s Episcopal Church on Queen Emma street downtown.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports on Jazz Vespers that happen every Thursday at St. Peter’s, starting at 6 in the evening.

Noe Tanigawa
Noe Tanigawa

Hawai‘i has a strong clay culture, and much of it is community based.  The Hawai‘i Potters’ Guild, the Volcano Village Artists, Hui No‘eau, the Lāna‘i Arts Center, and Kaua‘i Community College all play crucial roles keeping ceramics alive on their respective islands.  Recently, the Moloka‘i Arts Center jumped in too, for people love to work with clay.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports on the first statewide juried ceramics exhibition.

noe tanigawa
noe tanigawa

It’s absolutely true that some of the best things about the holidays are free.  You can prove it to yourself and your family by taking a spin around O‘ahu to take in the lights.

noe tanigawa
noe tanigawa

“Go for Broke” was the motto of the 442 Regimental Combat Team.  It was a spirit that changed the minds of Americans as they watched ethnic Japanese fight and die for the United States, even while their relatives were stripped of possessions and thrown into camps.  Over forty years later, President Reagan signed legislation that admitted "race prejudice, war hysteria, and a failure of political leadership" caused the internment.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports on the legacy we all share from this experience.

Face of the Enemy

Dec 6, 2016
United States War Department (United States National Archives) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons
United States War Department (United States National Archives) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

When Japan bombed Pearl Harbor seventy five years ago, thirty seven percent of Hawai‘i’s population was ethnically Japanese.  Honolulu hummed with Japanese run restaurants, sundry stores, hardware and grocery stores, everyone went to Japanese movies, and Japanese maids and gardeners worked in many wealthy homes.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports on how Japanese and others felt during the period.

U.S. National Archives
U.S. National Archives

The bombing of Pearl Harbor was a turning point for Hawai‘i, but it was also the culmination of decades of militarization on O‘ahu.  At the same time, ethnic Japanese constituted forty percent of Hawai‘i’s population, a fact not lost on Washington, as Japanese armies spread across China and the Pacific.

noe tanigawa
noe tanigawa

Rain, in old Hawai‘i, was celebrated in its myriad forms, passing mists to drenching downpours, different in each village and valley.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa spoke with a scholar and kumu hula whose book on Hawaiian rain names opens new vistas in the natural world.

noe tanigawa
noe tanigawa

In 2013, scholars and linguists worldwide were stunned by the discovery of a new indigenous language in Hawai‘i.  Hawai‘i Sign Language was the first new language discovered in the U.S. since the 1930’s.  There are about seven thousand spoken languages in the world, half of which are expected to be lost in the next fifty years.  An even more dire fate could await existing sign languages.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports on efforts to preserve Hawai‘i Sign and its unique view of the world.

noe tanigawa
noe tanigawa

“Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world; indeed, it's the only thing that ever has.”  When Margaret Mead said that, she could have been talking about a lot of community groups, including the small, hard working team that has kept the ARTS at Marks Garage alive for fifteen years now.   HPR's Noe Tanigawa reports.

Bliss Lau/Jasmine Takanikos
Bliss Lau/Jasmine Takanikos

Today, everyone who uses social media is, in effect, creating an image and a brand; activities that used to be the domain of advertising agencies.  As new media platforms evolve, the old advertising models are falling away, reflecting personal and societal changes both in habits and attitudes. 

noe tanigawa
noe tanigawa

November is Hawai‘i Fashion Month, and Honolulu Fashion Week festivities are getting underway at the Hawai‘i Convention Center.  This year’s Fashion Marketplace features nearly fifty designers of jewelry, clothing, and accessories from across the state.  Free runway shows featuring local and international designers run through today and tomorrow.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports.

Jasmine Takanikos
Jasmine Takanikos

Today, everyone who uses social media is, in effect, creating an image and a brand; activities that used to be the domain of advertising agencies.  The next HPR ThinkSpot with the Honolulu Museum of Art focuses on two successful entrepreneurs, jeweler Bliss Lau and branding and marketing strategist Jasmine Takanikos, who will share tips on centering your brand, as an entrepreneur or as an individual.

noe tanigawa
noe tanigawa

Syrian American hip hop artist, Omar Offendum, was ready when the World Trade Center attacks thrust him into the spotlight.  In the years since, he’s used his platform to build links between the U.S. and especially, the Syrian culture in which he was raised.  Offendum is in Honolulu now, for a residency at Doris Duke’s Shangri La Center for Islamic Arts and Cultures.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports Offendum employs the raw honesty characteristic of hip hop to explore tough issues on a human level.

noe tanigawa
noe tanigawa

Most people who live in Hawai‘i are conscious of a Hawai‘i Style, and over the years many have tried to put a finger on what that style is.  In the 20th century, UH Professor John Charlot wrote about a Hawaiian esthetic, calling it a distillation of our natural environment.

noe tanigawa
noe tanigawa

This is the last weekend to enjoy a particularly splash making exhibit at Spalding House in Makiki.  “Plastic Fantastic?” features beautiful art made of or about plastic debris.  In addition, HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports there’s progress on ways to deal with this ubiquitous, non-disposable substance. 

“Plastic Fantastic?” continues at the Honolulu Museum of Art’s Spalding House in Makiki through Sunday. 

Octrober 2, 2016.  

Ryoko Kimura
Ryoko Kimura

Japanese art and crafts have a reputation for quality and centuries of what seem like unbroken tradition behind them.  A new exhibition coming to Honolulu will feature experts in traditional metalwork, ceramics, painting, and fabric dye who use impeccable technique to tell contemporary stories.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports on Imayo: Japan’s New Traditionists.

noe tanigawa
noe tanigawa

According to the World Wildlife Fund, more than 90% of the plants and animals inhabiting Hawaii are native to this place, and a greater variety of fish exist in Hawaiian waters than anywhere else.  Protecting these plants and creatures can seem overwhelming, but individuals do find ways to make a difference.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports on one such case.


Margo Vitarelli
Margo Vitarelli

What we know and learn depends a lot on how we receive the information.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports a yearlong collaboration between local artists and scientists has yielded a cunning series of prints that intrigue, delight, and enlighten. 

Noe Tanigawa
Noe Tanigawa

 

  Some adventurous Honolulu ceramists have set the tables at Mark’s Garage with dinnerware you may not have seen the likes of before.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa found well-made new ways to serve your next meal.

“Dinner Party” continues at Mark’s Garage through October 1st.  

  Artist Mariko Merritt is one of the ten ceramists showing in the Dinner Party exhibition at Marks’ Garage.  She watched the show’s instigator, Daven Hee, as he made some imaginative mini pourers—perfect for shoyu.

noe tanigawa
noe tanigawa

In the run up through November, Fashion Month, Ala Moana Center is celebrating different facets of Hawai‘i’s fashion industry in a new pop up called the Fashion Annex.  The current exhibition features a view of fashion that is both ancient and possibly futuristic.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa explores the idea of clothing that integrates understanding of culture, materials, and place. 

noe tanigawa
noe tanigawa

  

   As art galleries have come and gone, more and more businesses have begun  showing  art as a regular part of their activities.  Eateries, especially, have been in on this for a while and a new café on Monsarrat is making art central to its mission.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports.

"The Artwork of Kelly Sueda and Lloyd Sueda” will be on view at ARS Café on Diamond Head through September .

noe tanigawa
noe tanigawa

In the mid-20th century, jazz, abstract expressionism, open form poetry, were some of the art forms that celebrated a kind of escape from regimentation and expectation.  An interest in process arose, and for some, the journey became more important than the destination.   HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports a revival of that spirit is underway, for example, in an exhibition at UH Mānoa.

This Wednesday around 2pm, skateboarders take on Peter Chamberlain’s interactive room.   Friday 2 to 4pm everyone’s invited to participate in the closing non-extravaganza.  

noe tanigawa
noe tanigawa

  

  Invasive Alien Species, IAS, are organisms introduced outside their natural range. This week, Hawai'i committed itself to a comprehensive new bio security plan against invasive alien species, but its success depends partly on how vigilant others are.  In 2010, nearly all the world‘s governments agreed to address IAS, but today, only three percent of countries are on track to meet international commitments.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports the Honolulu Challenge issued at the World Conservation Congress hopes to reinvigorate positive efforts.

noe tanigawa
noe tanigawa

  

 

 A potentially game changing new tool for business has been launched at the World Conservation Congress in Hawai‘i.  It’s called the Natural Capital Protocol and was tested with over fifty companies including Coca-Cola, Dow, Nestlé, and Shell.  For the first time, businesses and consumers can know the true costs of production.  

noe tanigawa
noe tanigawa

 

President Obama is coming to the world conservation congress in Honolulu to herald the creation of the world's largest ecologically protected area, Papahanaumokuakea. The northwestern sweep of Hawai’i’s archipelago is a treasure for biologists, marine scientists, archaeologists, cultural practitioners, naval historians, and others.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports mysterious stone figures are among the items featured in a new exhibit at the Bishop Museum. 

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