Mahalo Aina

Archives available below
  • Hosted by Christopher Phillips

Mahalo ʻĀina is a 13-week series of reports designed to raise awareness of the many environmental, economic, social and cultural benefits provided by Hawaiʻi's forests and the need for human responsibility in protecting and perpetuating these ecosystems.

The 90-second Mahalo ʻĀina vignettes air each weekday on Morning Edition (HPR-1) at 8:18 a.m. The 65 episodes will re-run on HPR-2 starting August 3, 2015 at 3:58 p.m

The series is hosted and written by Christopher Phillips, a science communication and education specialist whose work focuses on scientific issues affecting society in the 21st Century. His work has been featured in diverse fields, such as astronomy, climate change, and technological development.

The series is a collaboration between

Hawaiʻi Forest Institute
Hawaiʻi Forest Industry Association
County of Hawaiʻi Department of Research and Development
State of Hawaiʻi Department of Land and Natural Resources – Division of Forestry and Wildlife
Atherton Family Foundation
State of Hawaii Department of Agriculture
Kamehameha Schools
and Hawaiʻi Public Radio.

Land owners in Hawaii are some of the key stakeholders in efforts to protect the forests and watershed areas of the islands. Stewardship programs and strategic partnerships are vital to maintaining the health of the Aina.

Christopher Phillips explains...

Coconut Coast Condo
Coconut Coast Condo

When we think of forests and the economy, we think of logging and timber as a product of the forest resource. There are however a plethora of products that come from the forest, that aren't timber at all.

Christopher Phillips explains...

www.koawoodrings.com
www.koawoodrings.com

Most of us are at least partially aware of the benefits that the forest provides for us, but the depth of the relationship between our society and the forest probably escapes us. We examine the depth of the relationship that defines life in the Hawaiian islands.

Christopher Phillips explains...

Soil Erosion

Feb 3, 2016
J.B. Friday, University of Hawaiʻi
J.B. Friday, University of Hawaiʻi

The Earth is constantly changing. Mountains rise and fall, the forces that shape our ʻaina are unceasing. Erosion is one such consequence of the constant jostling of environmental forces, such as wind, rain, glaciation, and volcanism. We take a look at how these forces shape the ʻaina.

Christopher Phillips explains...

J.B. Friday, University of Hawai'i
J.B. Friday, University of Hawai'i

The great outdoors beckons us. We roam the forest trails of Hawaiʻi gazing with wonder and quiet reflection at the forest around us. The trails we walk take us on a journey not only through the beauty of the natural world, but also through paths trodden by those who came before in times past.

Christopher Phillips explains...

Kaua‘i Watershed Alliance
Kaua‘i Watershed Alliance

Water, it is the single most important ingredient for life on planet Earth, and for life in the Hawaiian Islands. The ecosystems of the Hawaiian Islands are entirely dependent on water for their survival, as are the humans that inhabit these islands.

Christopher Phillips explains...

J.B. Friday, University of Hawaiʻi
J.B. Friday, University of Hawaiʻi

Along the Ka'u coastline of Hawaiʻi Island, there is a very special piece of land. It is the Kapapala Canoe Forest. It is a parcel of land over 1200 acres in area. It is a crucial cultural and educational resource and link between land and sea, past and present.

Christopher Phillips explains...

DLNR
DLNR

The Natural Area Reserve System, or NARS, is spread across the state of Hawaiʻi. It was established by the Hawaiʻi Department of Land and Natural Resources to preserve a variety of natural areas which support local communities, areas of natural flora and fauna, and important geological sites.

Christopher Phillips explains...

J.B. Friday, University of Hawai'i
J.B. Friday, University of Hawai'i

When we think of life in the city, the forest is probably the last thing on our minds, and yet in many cities around the world the nurturing of the urban forest is a priority. Green spaces and the urban tree canopy are considered integral to the sustainability and quality of life in large cities such as Honolulu.

Christopher Phillips explains...

Moanalua Gardens Foundation
Moanalua Gardens Foundation

The Moanalua Gardens is devoted to preserving the native culture and environment of Hawaiʻi through education and cultural practice. They offer a range of educational programs, from school field trips, to weekend walks, and even cultural festivals. One of their most celebrated offerings is the annual Prince Lot Hula Festival.

Christopher Phillips explains...

Paul Jokiel
Paul Jokiel

It is often said that the coral reefs of Hawaiʻi are the tropical rainforests of the ocean. Just as the land forests of the Hawaiian islands are home to an incredibly diverse selection of ecosystems, so too are the coral reefs.

Christopher Phillips explains...

DLNR
DLNR

Hunting is a valued traditional past time in Hawaiʻi. For many socially-conscious hunters it is a means to gather quality meat from a trusted and often sustainable source. For hunting to serve such wide ranging interests it is imperative that prospective hunters receive appropriate education, and this is where the hunter education program comes in.

Christopher Phillips explains...

Lei Day

Feb 3, 2016
J.B. Friday, University of Hawaiʻi
J.B. Friday, University of Hawaiʻi

The first of May, May Day, as it is known in the northern hemisphere, is a celebration of spring, the beginning of the seasonal bloom which will lead to a bountiful harvest later on in the year. Here in Hawaiʻi, we know this day also as Lei Day – a celebration of culture and tradition.

Christopher Phillips explains...

Bioblitz

Feb 3, 2016
National Park Service / Jay Robinson
National Park Service / Jay Robinson

Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park is host to a remarkable confluence of science and culture, the annual Bioblitz event. This unique two-day event brings together scientists, cultural practitioners, and the public.

Christopher Phillips explains...

Bishop Museum
Bishop Museum

One of the most iconic links between culture and the forest is in the form of the kapa cloth. This fabric is constructed using the fibers of trees and plants.

Christopher Phillips explains...

US Fish & Wildlife Service
US Fish & Wildlife Service

The Schoolyard Habitat program helps teachers and students create wildlife habitats at their own schools. These habitats provide a naturalized habitat area, a crucial sanctuary for local species.

Christopher Phillips explains...

State Parks

Feb 3, 2016
DLNR Division of State Parks
DLNR Division of State Parks

Hawaiʻi's state parks are home to some of its most iconic and celebrated landscapes, cultural treasures, and recreational opportunities. There are 50 parks across the state, covering a total area of around 30,000 acres. These parks can be found everywhere, from the urban sprawl of Honolulu, to the remote and rugged wild lands of Hawaiʻi Island.

Christopher Phillips explains...

National Climate Assessment
National Climate Assessment

Climate change is an issue that resonates deeply within our communities in Hawaiʻi. Our economy, culture and health all depend on the health of ecosystems across the state. From the highest mountain peaks, to the coral reefs and near shore environments, we depend on these ecosystems for the survival of our society.

Christopher Phillips explains...

The University of Hawaiʻi Honey Bee Project
The University of Hawaiʻi Honey Bee Project

When the products of the forest are on the dinner plate, there is arguably no greater appreciation of them. One of the sweetest products to grace our tables is uniquely Hawaiian. Hawaiian honey can be found across the islands.

Christopher Phillips explains...

The Hawaiian Vanilla Company
The Hawaiian Vanilla Company

One of the only commercial vanilla farms in the United States, exists on the lush wild slopes of Hawaiʻi Island. Hawaiian vanilla is said to be the second most expensive spice in the world. This exotic ingredient can be found in dishes the world over.

Christopher Phillips explains...

Office of Mauna Kea Management (OMKM)
Office of Mauna Kea Management (OMKM)

A large portion of the land mass of Hawaiʻi Island, is contained on the slopes of the tallest mountain in the world, Mauna Kea. The mountain is host to a variety of ecosystems, stretching from the coastal waters, to the arid aeolian desert of the summit area.

Christopher Phillips explains...

The Nature Conservancy
The Nature Conservancy

One of the most notorious and well documented threats to Hawaiʻi's forests ecosystem, comes in the form of sheep, pigs, and goats – the ungulates. The ungulates are responsible for much of the ecological devastation that has befallen the forest understory. Many precious plants species have been brought to the brink of extinction by the insatiable appetites of the ungulates.

Christopher Phillips explains...

Wikipedia
Wikipedia

Nestled atop of the lush Mānoa Valley watershed, there is the Lyon Arboretum. It is located a mere five miles from the bustling crowds and noise of Waikīkī. The Arboretum itself serves as a scientific and cultural resource for Oʻahu's mostly urban population.

Christopher Phillips explains...

Restoration Agroforestry, Dr. Travis Idol
Restoration Agroforestry, Dr. Travis Idol

The task of restoring Hawaiʻi's forests is nothing short of monumental. To truly make a difference in protecting precious island ecosystem it requires substantial financial investment, expenditure in manhours and a logistical train of plant materials, and support for volunteers, students, and professional scientists.

Christopher Phillips explains...

The Nature Conservancy
The Nature Conservancy

Water, or wai in the Hawaiian language, is the heart of life in Hawaiian Islands. It maintains the many precious ecosystems across the state, it drives the agricultural economy, provides fresh drinking water, and unlimited health benefits. It's no wonder then that water lies at the heart of Hawaiian culture as the most treasured natural resource and a central cultural pillar.

Christopher Phillips explains...

Hal Lum
Hal Lum

Across the state of Hawaiʻi there are hundreds of skilled, pasionate artisans. Workshops and galleries showcase the very best of local creativity, and talent can be found in every corner of the state of Hawaiʻi.

Christopher Phillips explains...

The Hawai'i Conservation Alliance
The Hawai'i Conservation Alliance

The Hawaiʻi Conservation Alliance is composed of twenty organizations, including governmental, cultural, educational, and nonprofit. Their mission is to safeguard the biodiversity of Hawaiʻi's ecosystems.

Christopher Phillips explains...

HFIA
HFIA

Carbon reduction is a frequently mentioned topic in today's society. Society faces the specter of climate change and the consequences brought about by years of the unrestrained burning of fossil fuels. But what can we do here in Hawaiʻi to combat climate change?

Christopher Phillips explains...

Pacific Island Fisheries Group
Pacific Island Fisheries Group

The vast Pacific ocean, appears to stretch endlessly to the horizon when viewed from the shores of Hawaiʻi. The ocean depths are hidden from view, but the products of the ocean find their way to our dinner tables every day.

Christopher Phillips explains...

www.fireantfreemaui.org
www.fireantfreemaui.org

The little fire ant, or LFA as it is informally known, is an unwelcome visitor to the Hawaiian islands. It's small size and light orange color belie its devastating potential. This tiny invader is native to Central and South America, and was thought to have been introduced accidentally to Hawaiʻi.

Christopher Phillips explains...

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