Mahalo Aina

Archives available below
  • Hosted by Christopher Phillips

Mahalo ʻĀina is a 13-week series of reports designed to raise awareness of the many environmental, economic, social and cultural benefits provided by Hawaiʻi's forests and the need for human responsibility in protecting and perpetuating these ecosystems.

The 90-second Mahalo ʻĀina vignettes air each weekday on Morning Edition (HPR-1) at 8:18 a.m. The 65 episodes will re-run on HPR-2 starting August 3, 2015 at 3:58 p.m

The series is hosted and written by Christopher Phillips, a science communication and education specialist whose work focuses on scientific issues affecting society in the 21st Century. His work has been featured in diverse fields, such as astronomy, climate change, and technological development.

The series is a collaboration between

Hawaiʻi Forest Institute
Hawaiʻi Forest Industry Association
County of Hawaiʻi Department of Research and Development
State of Hawaiʻi Department of Land and Natural Resources – Division of Forestry and Wildlife
Atherton Family Foundation
State of Hawaii Department of Agriculture
Kamehameha Schools
and Hawaiʻi Public Radio.

Eco-tourism

Feb 2, 2016
Hawaii Forest & Trail
Hawaii Forest & Trail

Eco-tourism is one of Hawaiʻi's major draws to visitors. The sheer variation in natural environments that the islands have to offer, attracts the usual crowd of campers and hikers and beachgoers to famous spots all over the islands. But those seeking a more enlightening experience will head for one of the many eco-tourism opportunities that can be found in Hawaiʻi.

Christopher Phillips explains...

Bio-energy

Feb 2, 2016
Wn.com
Wn.com

Energy independence has been a contentious issue in Hawaiʻi for some time. The state relies on imported fossil fuels to meet its rising energy demands. These fossil fuels produce greenhouse gases when burned, fueling the global climate change.

Christopher Phillips explains...

Erin Miller, West Hawaii Today
Erin Miller, West Hawaii Today

A defining feature of the Hamākua coast of Hawaiʻi Island is the vast plantations of eucalyptus trees that stretch back from highway 11. The Eucalyptus tree was introduced to Hawaiʻi around 150 years ago. It was chosen for its attractive traits, including fast growth, which makes it an attract wood product and a potential economic generator.

Christopher Phillips explains...

Anthony Savvis
Anthony Savvis

Along the North Kona Coast of Hawaiʻi Island, there are a cluster of endangered plant preserves. Around 70 of them are located at the villages of LaʻiʻŌpua in Kealakehe. These precious sites of restoration are managed by the Hawaiʻi Forest Institute, the Hawaiʻi Forest Industry Association, and The Department of Hawaiian Homelands.

Christopher Phillips explains...

Toby Hoogs
Toby Hoogs

The future holds little certainty. Our planet and the wondrous multitude of lifeforms that inhabit its surface face a critical juncture. As the dominant life form on planet Earth, the choices we make in this century will define us for generations to come.

Christopher Phillips explains...

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