New Zealand

Pixabay Commons
Pixabay Commons

Several organizations are trying to increase the number of business start-ups in Hawai‘i. From seed funding to business incubators, more resources are slowly becoming available. Across the Pacific, governments are floating some other ideas to achieve the same goals. HPR’s Bill Dorman has details in today’s Asia Minute.

If you’re a technology entrepreneur with an idea that can create jobs, the government of New Zealand would love to hear from you.  And there might be a visa in it for you.

Wikipedia Commons
Wikipedia Commons

Last week a referendum in New Zealand decisively rejected the Silver Fern flag.  Prime Minister John Key spent about $17-million on a two year project to select a new design.  But voters had the final word and decided to retain the familiar navy blue flag with the Union Jack and the stars of the Southern Cross. But, as we hear from Neal Conan in the Pacific News Minute, there will be a new flag in the Pacific later this year, in Fiji.

Wikipedia Commons
Wikipedia Commons

A lot of attention in the political world is focused on tomorrow’s primary elections--from Ohio to Florida. But on the other side of the world, another kind of election is going on—with consequences that will linger for years. HPR’s Bill Dorman has more in today’s Asia Minute.

New Zealand is in the midst of a national election.  Citizens are not choosing a national leader or even a local representative—they’re selecting a FLAG.  You might remember this story—it’s been going on for a while.  In fact the initial discussions date back to the time of the Second World War.

www.facebook.com/threewisecousins
www.facebook.com/threewisecousins

 After surprisingly good numbers at the box office in New Zealand, a comedy shot on a shoestring in Samoa is now set for release in Australia. "Three Wise Cousins" came in at number seven, earning about two hundred thousand dollars in two weeks on just eight screens. More from Neal Conan in the Pacific News Minute.

 

Wikipedia Commons
Wikipedia Commons

One of the more colorful Internet entrepreneurs faces extradition to the United States. Kim Dotcom could serve up to twenty years if convicted on multiple charges including copyright infringement, money laundering and wire fraud.  A week ago, a judge in New Zealand found the evidence against him and three co-defendants overwhelming.  The background, from Neal Conan in the Pacific News Minute.

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