art&culture

noe tanigawa
noe tanigawa

Ward Warehouse is set to close in August to make way for a luxury high rise project. Many popular shops like Eden in Love and MORI by Art + Flea, will relocate to other Ward properties. HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports Na Mea Hawai‘i/Native Books is having a blast until the closing moment.

noe tanigawa

Pa’i Foundation Gallery at Kālia is an enclave for Native Hawaiian art at the center of the mall level at Ala Moana Center.   They’ve made it easy to catch the MAMo Juried Exhibit of ceramics, glass, paintings, photographs, wearable art, and more.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports.

noe tanigawa
noe tanigawa

The Honolulu Biennial may be over but Maoli Arts Movement, or MAMo activities have picked right up, recognizing Native Hawaiian artists.  This year, Moana Eisele is being honored for her kapa work, along with Umi Kai for his recreations of Hawaiian implements and weaponry.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa caught up with another 2017 MAMo honoree, painter and historian, Brook Parker at Marks Garage, where the three are showing through July 5th.  

Adamu Waziri

Cartoons once dismissed as filler or just for laughs, are big business now.  Animations can shape our view of the world and now, hand in hand with virtual reality and digital gaming, animations are being used to preserve and perpetuate traditional culture.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports.

Kyle Wright, courtesy of PAʻI Foundation
Kyle Wright, courtesy of PAʻI Foundation

Nita Pilago’s Wahine Toa designs were a sell out, again, at the recent Merrie Monarch in Hilo.  Just eight years in, her small Kona company is expanding production in Bali and Pilago has a new line of lava themed pieces planned for the upcoming MAMo Wearable Art Show.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports.

noe tanigawa
noe tanigawa

The 2017 Artists of Hawai‘i exhibition at the Honolulu Museum of Art is more about experience than depiction this year.  Kasey Lindley’s video installation merges technology and play.  Another installation, made of tissue, cloth and thread, burrows into both body and psyche.  Kaori Ukaji spoke to HPR’s Noe Tanigawa about her piece, Serenely  Proliferating.

noe tanigawa
noe tanigawa

For those who saw it in 2012, artist Kaili Chun’s twenty four hour pop up installation of fifty 8-foot steel cells on Waimānalo Beach was a testimony to the mute power of art.  Right now, her installation of fishnets at the Honolulu Museum and hundreds of copper fish at the Prince Waikīkī nicely bookend Chun’s ideas about global systems and the importance of place.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports.

creative commons
creative commons

People around the nation and world are using development as a community organizing tool.  Change becomes a reason to work with others and improve their neighborhoods.  Now, the UH Mānoa Architecture School is convening designers, government leaders, and community members to inject fresh ideas into Honolulu’s development plans.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports on the Building Voices Symposium and Design Competition set for Earth Day, April 22nd .

HOT
HOT

One of the most popular operas in the entire repertory, Tales of Hoffmann, will close Hawai‘i Opera Theatre’s 2016-17 season.  Live projections and a roster of fine voices mark this all original production, the last with Artistic Director Henry Akina at the helm.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa spoke to him about his tenure in Hawai‘i opera.

Taiji Terasaki
Taiji Terasaki

This year, the Contact Hawai‘i show at the Honolulu Museum of Art School asked artists to envision our islands a thousand years from now.  Some artists came up with post-apocalyptic scenarios, a giant white tiki carving is bound by ropes on the front lawn, while others explored tourism, climate change, relationships, and more.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports on one artist’s vision of Hawai‘i as a bountiful Eden.

Chris Hong
Chris Hong

The UH Athletics Department is looking at ways to energize its area there in the quarry on the Mānoa campus.  They turned to the UH Architecture Department for ideas on how to create a vibrant community feel, stretching from upper campus through lower campus, into the community as a whole.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports on a very special project and the ideas it generated.

Roseanne Barr
Roseanne Barr

Comedian, television personality, Roseanne Barr has been living on Hawai‘i island for the last eight years.  She and her family recently opened a store, Honoka‘a Country Market, selling locally raised Andrade beef and soon, her own nuts, pineapples, and produce.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa caught up with Roseanne ahead of her stand up shows at the Blue Note, Saturday and Sunday.

noe tanigawa
noe tanigawa

People gravitate to Andrew Binkley’s “Stone Cloud” at Foster Garden.  Part of the Honolulu Biennial, it is big, and looks quite heavy, hovering over the heads of those who wander by.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa caught up with Binkley there in the Garden to find out what he had in mind.

noe tanigawa
noe tanigawa

Matthew James combines painting and sculpture in his large three dimensional wall pieces.  You can see several around Honolulu now---the largest is a twenty-one by fifteen foot wall of blue wave patterns on the mauka side of Ala Moana Boulevard, on the Salt complex.  You can also see his work in Italy, Miami, New York City, Manila, Iceland, and other locations.  James left Hawai‘i for New York City seventeen years ago, and HPR’s Noe Tanigawa caught him at his studio in Brooklyn for these reflections.

noe tanigawa
noe tanigawa

Honolulu is having an art moment.  The Honolulu Biennial is raising awareness, new construction is providing opportunities, and established businesses are realizing art’s marketing potential.  Without the benefit of traditional galleries, an alternative infrastructure has been preparing artists for this moment.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa traces how choice pieces, many representing Hawai‘i’s  stories and culture, are appearing around town.

noe tanigawa

Art Biennials are big business, as you can tell by the proliferation of bi and triennials around the globe over the last twenty years.  Cities launch these high profile art extravaganzas to attract tourists, sales, and cultural cache.  The Honolulu Biennial has just opened in nine venues around town, HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports on how to make the most of it.