coral reef

JeepersMedia / Flickr
JeepersMedia / Flickr

This week is a busy one for Hawai‘i’s visitor industry. And while another record year is expected for tourism, more people at the beach means plenty of sunscreen ends up in the ocean. There’s now a movement in Maui County to ban sunscreen containing chemicals that scientists say are harming the reefs. We get more from HPR contributing reporter Colleen Uechi of The Maui News

Sustainable Reefs and Aquarium Fish

Jun 1, 2017
Flickr / NOAA Photo Library
Flickr / NOAA Photo Library

A bill awaiting Governor Ige's signature would end the commercial collecting of Hawaii reef wildlife for the aquarium trade. The legislature passed SB 1240, requiring the Department of Land and Natural Resources to develop a plan that factors in sustainability when it comes to Hawai'i reef fish and the aquarium trade. It's a bill strongly backed by Robert Wintner—president of Snorkel Bob's Hawai'i, who contributed this commentary to Hawai'i Public Radio.

Wikimedia Commons
Wikimedia Commons

Preserving ocean coral is a priority for many scientists and others around the world, including here in Hawai‘i. One challenge is rising ocean temperatures—but another one can be certain aspects of tourism. HPR’s Bill Dorman has more in today’s Asia Minute.

Wikimedia Commons
Wikimedia Commons

An assessment of Hawaii’s reef fish populations shows that 11 species are possibly overfished.

Wikimedia Commons
Wikimedia Commons

  We’ll explore what happens when groundwater enters the coastal reef ecosystem. We’ll learn about the effects of land-based pollutants, such as fertilizers and chemicals in wastewater, as they find their way to the ocean.

Mālama Olowalu
Mālama Olowalu

The State Department of Transportation has scrapped a plan to construct a seawall in West Maui following a week long protest.  The plan was to build a wall of boulders near mile marker 16 along the shoreline of Honoapi‘ilani highway to protect the road from erosion.  But environmentalists say the wall would threaten coral reefs and surf breaks by altering the natural flow of sand.  They added that it would ruin beach access, and not truly alleviate the road’s safety issues.  

The Conversation: Friday, June 24th, 2016

Jun 24, 2016
Marine Conservation Science Institute

Coral Reef Symposium; Studying Sharks; Collusion Among Contractors for School AC; Rising Stars Showcase

Coral Reef Symposium: Hugh Possingham

Coral Surveys 2.0: New Technology Maps Reefs

Jun 23, 2016
XL Catlin Seaview Survey
XL Catlin Seaview Survey

The bigger picture surrounding the state of our reefs just became a bit clearer. New technology and imaging data are helping scientists quickly survey coral reefs from around the world. HPR’s Molly Solomon has more.

Equipped with a 360-degree underwater camera and three powerful processing units, a collaborative research project has become a coral data goldmine.

The Conversation: Thursday, June 23rd, 2016

Jun 23, 2016
Wikimedia

Former Meth Addict; Singer Lisa Fischer; Reef Degradation from Sunscreen; Betty Loo Taylor Documentary

Overcoming Meth-Addict: Latisha

NOAA Photo Library / Flickr
NOAA Photo Library / Flickr

  Scientists working to prevent coral reef destruction have stumbled onto some good news.

In one of the largest global studies reef studies, researchers discovered fifteen “Bright Spots” where reefs were doing better than expected.   The areas weren’t always pristine… but had more fish, and were more resilient to human impact and unfavorable environmental conditions.

Wikimedia Commons
Wikimedia Commons

Sustainable seafood is an important part of Hawai‘i’s local diet.  The Hawai‘i Seafood Council lists sixteen species of wild and sustainable fish that come from waters around the islands.  But the waters around the Philippines are facing new challenges when it comes to sustainable fishing. HPR’s Bill Dorman has more in today’s Asia Minute.

Leading Coral Experts Prepare For Symposium in Hawaii

May 11, 2016
Flickr / NOAA's National Ocean Service
Flickr / NOAA's National Ocean Service

Hundreds of the world’s top ocean scientists will gather in Honolulu next month for the 13th International Coral Reef Symposium. It’s the first time the conference will be held in Hawai‘i. 

Leading coral experts say it’s a critical time for our reefs. Warming sea temperatures and increased ocean acidification are continuing to stress these ecosystems. Human activity has also taken a toll: overfishing, runoff of sewage and sediments from the shore.

The Conversation: Monday, May 2nd, 2016

May 2, 2016
Flickr - Ben Wagner

Crowd-funding Open Government; Past and Future Conservation in Hawai‘i; HART Chair Colleen Hanabusa; New Discoveries About Coral Growth

Hui for Good Government Crowd-funding: Keiko Bonk

NOAA's National Ocean Service / Flickr
NOAA's National Ocean Service / Flickr

Understanding the DNA of life in Hawai‘i’s coral reefs may hold the key to protecting diversity through changing conditions.

The Conversation: Thursday, March 31st, 2016

Mar 31, 2016
Flickr - USFWS Pacific Region

Coral Reef Dredging; History of Pacific Nuclear Testing; Public-Private Partnership on Homelessness; Development in Waikiki; Jane Hirshfield Poetry 

Coral Reef Dredging in the South China Sea: Professor Camilo Mora

Paul Jokiel
Paul Jokiel

It is often said that the coral reefs of Hawaiʻi are the tropical rainforests of the ocean. Just as the land forests of the Hawaiian islands are home to an incredibly diverse selection of ecosystems, so too are the coral reefs.

Christopher Phillips explains...

Wayne Yoshioka

Opponents of commercial aquarium fish collecting in Hawai’i were handed a setback today by the state.   HPR’s Wayne Yoshioka reports.

Raphael Ritson-Williams
Raphael Ritson-Williams

Researchers with the University of Hawaii at Manoa are being honored for their work to understand and reverse coral bleaching. The team headed by Ruth Gates and Madeleine van Oppen from the Australian Institute of Marine Science attempts to grow coral that’s resistant to the effects of global warming and rising levels of acid in the water.

UH Biologists Use Super Coral to Build a Better Reef

May 29, 2014
Flickr / pixtory
Flickr / pixtory

Coral reefs around the world are showing signs of decline. Recent climate assessments indicate the ocean’s temperature and acidity levels are rising. Those trends are particularly harmful to Hawaii, which is home to more than 60% of the nation’s coral. But as HPR’s Molly Solomon reports, scientists at the University of Hawaii are working hard to make sure our reefs have a future.