culture

EvanLee / Pixabay
EvanLee / Pixabay

Today on Bytemarks Café, a project that brings together traditional knowledge and storytelling with game design. The project is called Skins and it's part of the initiative for Indigenous Futures Partnership to create new culturally-based stories.

noe tanigawa
noe tanigawa

One of the great pleasures of living in a place, is learning the stories about its nooks and crannies.  In HPR’s Hometown collection, we visit places of historical or cultural interest  that may be easy to miss.  Today in Hometown Honolulu, HPR’s Noe Tanigawa visits a memorial right outside the State Archives, and a petroglyph site in Nu‘uanu.

noe tanigawa
noe tanigawa

Starting today through Sunday, the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center is staging a pop up in the old Foodland location at Ala Moana Center.  Audiences are invited to hear and see over fifty artists and thinkers from across the country and Hawai‘i filling the space with their work.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa stopped by for a preview.

oiwi tv
oiwi tv

Two hundred forty five crewmembers participated onboard the Hōkūle‘a in the Mālama Honua Worldwide Voyage, but many thousands more participated from land, following the voyage online.  Case in point, Vince Farrant, a recent Kamehameha School graduate, who followed the canoe’s progress and met many crewmembers through a Celestial Navigation class at Kamehameha  School.  In HPR's Noe Tanigawa's  interview, he reflects on the significance of this voyage for new generations. 

Adamu Waziri

Cartoons once dismissed as filler or just for laughs, are big business now.  Animations can shape our view of the world and now, hand in hand with virtual reality and digital gaming, animations are being used to preserve and perpetuate traditional culture.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports.

noe tanigawa
noe tanigawa

Matthew James combines painting and sculpture in his large three dimensional wall pieces.  You can see several around Honolulu now---the largest is a twenty-one by fifteen foot wall of blue wave patterns on the mauka side of Ala Moana Boulevard, on the Salt complex.  You can also see his work in Italy, Miami, New York City, Manila, Iceland, and other locations.  James left Hawai‘i for New York City seventeen years ago, and HPR’s Noe Tanigawa caught him at his studio in Brooklyn for these reflections.

noe tanigawa
noe tanigawa

Master carver Kawika Eskaran has built canoes, he’s sailed and works with Polynesian navigators and directs special projects at BYU-Hawai‘i.  His sculpture at the corner of South and Ala Moana is designed to bring peace to an area with a troubled history.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports, it is also a navigational reference, for those who understand.

Wikimedia Commons
Wikimedia Commons

  We’ll explore the intersection of culture, technology and the hackathon. What happens when you immerse the participants in the cultural experience of Aloha ʻĀina and how does this influence technology?

PREL
PREL

An initiative to collect and share stories from around the region is getting under way.  A group called Pacific Resources for Education and Learning has launched the Pacific Storytellers Cooperative.

It’s an internet platform for stories from around the Pacific to be uploaded and shared with a global audience.  The cooperative is accepting stories, videos, pictures, and poems from across the region and organizers say the goal is bridge the gap between oral history and the digital world.

Flickr - john Morgan

The History of Political Correctness; "Finding the 9th" Art Exhibit; Mindfulness and Joy in Troubled Times; West African Dance in Hawaii

The Downside to Political Correctness? Father Walter Brownridge

Wikimedia Commons
Wikimedia Commons

  You would figure that two countries with democracy and open-market economies would be able to work closely together. But that’s not the case between Japan and South Korea. And although they have specific values in common, how they deal with one another and the U.S. deals with both is often a case of national identity. We talk to two scholars who call for a grand bargain in their new book. That’s today at 5 on HPR-2.

Flickr Commons
Flickr Commons

  The number of visitors to Hawai‘i from South Korea has grown substantially in recent years. And Hawai‘i has been home to a significant Korean community for more than a century. In fact, the first large group of Korean immigrants to the United States landed in Hawai‘i in 1903, to work on the sugar plantations. When it comes to South Korea today, certain international attitudes are shifting. HPR’s Bill Dorman explains in today’s Asia Minute.

In the 1970’s and 80’s, there was so much business activity in Singapore, Hong Kong, Taiwan, and South Korea they were dubbed the Four Asian Tigers.  Based on per capita income,  Singapore and Hong Kong achieved advanced economic status in the late 80’s, Taiwan followed in 2010, Korea, however, has lagged far behind.  Research into this disparity shows that social trust could be key to economies of the future.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports.

Hawaii is not the only place where the use of pidgin gets debated. In Singapore, the use of language is the topic of an annual government campaign. HPR’s Bill Dorman has more in today’s Asia Minute.

Molly Solomon
Molly Solomon

For most Chamorro people living in Hawai`i, hearing the language of their ancestors is a rare thing. But, as HPR’s Molly Solomon reports, members in the Pacific Island community are working to revitalize the language and keep it alive for generations to come.

The Chamorro language class meets weekly at Kaka'ako Kitchen, every Saturday at 10 am.

For more information on the class, contact Kenneth Gofigan Kuper at kennethkuper@gmail.com or the Marianas Club at marianas@hawaii.edu.

Tourism Trends Show Japanese Seeking Out Local Culture

Apr 25, 2013
Flickr / chibirashka
Flickr / chibirashka

March turned out to be another month of growth for tourism in the state. The Hawaii Tourism Authority says overall visitor arrivals were up 7.6% compared to a year earlier, while visitor spending was up 7.8%. The number of tourists coming from Japan was also up—by a little more than four percent. And a growing trend for those Japanese visitors is a movement beyond Waikiki---searching for a more local experience. HPR’s Molly Solomon reports.

Local Photographer Turns Lens Toward Waikiki

Oct 17, 2012
Eric Yanagi

Nearly 40 years ago, a 22-year old artist decided to document the changing landscape of Honolulu's most famous neighborhood --- Waikiki.  That artist was local photographer Eric Yanagi.  

Thanks to a state grant, Yanagi completed the year-long project in 1973. His focus was on the community that was living in a rapidly developing Waikiki.  Now he’s compiled a collection of his photographs that are on display at UH Manoa, “Framing Paradise: Photography and Waikiki.”