Guam

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Wikimedia Commons

It’s been a tough year for Guam. Dozens of lawsuits have been filed accusing Catholic priests there of sexual abuse and, more recently, North Korea’s threatened to fire missiles at the island. Now, Guam’s representative in the U.S. Congress faces an ethics investigation…we have details from Neal Conan in today’s Pacific News Minute.

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Flood Insurance Maps; Life Under Threat from North Korea; Unions in Hawaii   

          

The Conversation: Friday, August 11th, 2017

Aug 11, 2017
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North Korea; Keeping Calm in Guam; Making the Case for GMO’s

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73 years after the liberation of Guam, the US government has started to process claims for reparations. A bill signed by President Obama last December resolved decades of disputes over payments to those who suffered under Japanese occupation but we hear from Neal Conan in today’s Pacific News Minute, the arguments aren’t over yet.

In December 1941, Nine-year-old Forrest Mendiola Harris fled when bombs started dropping on his village. Now 85, he told the Pacific Daily News “I just want to say that I’m lucky that I lived through the war.”

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Wikimedia Commons

This week, the Archdiocese of Guam asked a federal court to dismiss dozens of law suits filed by former altar boys who say they were raped and assaulted by priests as far back as the 1970s. The key to the suits was a law passed last year that lifted the statute of limitations, and as we hear from Neal Conan in today’s Pacific News Minute, that law is also the basis of the Archdiocese’s argument.

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Wikimedia Commons

Last month, we reported on Guam’s dispute with the Justice Department over voter eligibility in a plebiscite restricted to Chamorros. In another similar case, the Justice Department charges that Guam’s Chamorro Land Trust violates anti-discrimination provisions of the Fair Housing Act. We have details from Neal Conan in the Pacific News Minute.

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Wikimedia Commons

Late last week, a federal judge in Guam struck down the territory’s plan to hold a plebiscite on de-colonization. The ruling said that a ballot restricted to Chamorros violates the constitution’s ban on racial discrimination. More from Neal Conan in today’s Pacific News Minute.

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Wikimedia Commons

A retired bishop in the Northern Marianas has been accused of sex abuse against an altar boy. The charges date back to 1971, when Tomas Camacho served as a priest in Guam and, as we hear from Neal Conan in today’s Pacific News Minute, it’s just the latest in a long series of accusations.

Wikimedia Commons
Wikimedia Commons

It now looks like Guam will hold its decolonization plebiscite in 2018. The island's indigenous people will be asked whether they prefer independence, statehood, or Free Association with the U.S. More from Neal Conan in today's Pacific News Minute.

U.S. Department of Agriculture / Flickr
U.S. Department of Agriculture / Flickr

In his State of the Island address last week, Guam Governor Eddie Calvo announced plans to hold a plebiscite on the island's political future this November.  The choices would be Statehood...Free association with the United States...or independence. We have more from Neal Conan in the Pacific News Minute.

Noe Tanigawa
Noe Tanigawa

  The 2010 U.S. Census reported that Chamorro, the indigenous people of the Mariana Islands, are the third largest Pacific Islander group in the US.  Chamorro arrived in Hawaii aboard whaling ships in the  1800’s, and a community of seven thousand lives here now.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports on Craig Santos Perez,  a Chamorro writer living in Hawai‘i who has just won an American Book Award.