pearl harbor

Hawaii Island Festival of the Birds

Equifax Data Hack; Cleaning West Loch; Birding On The Big Island

Hawai‘i DLNR
Hawai‘i DLNR

A new study will determine if oysters can improve water quality in Pearl Harbor.

noe tanigawa
noe tanigawa

Amidst the flurry of Executive Orders issued recently by President Trump, a seventy five year old Order is being re-examined.  Executive Order 9066 by President Roosevelt in 1942, banned “any or all persons” from “military areas” as determined by the Secretary of War and military commanders.  Though this order and the Japanese internment it caused have been discredited in the courts, political figures have used it recently to support new rules around immigration.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports on what is at stake.

noe tanigawa
noe tanigawa

“Go for Broke” was the motto of the 442 Regimental Combat Team.  It was a spirit that changed the minds of Americans as they watched ethnic Japanese fight and die for the United States, even while their relatives were stripped of possessions and thrown into camps.  Over forty years later, President Reagan signed legislation that admitted "race prejudice, war hysteria, and a failure of political leadership" caused the internment.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports on the legacy we all share from this experience.

Gallery - Kamehameha Schools
Gallery - Kamehameha Schools

Today we are wrapping up our coverage commemorating the 75th anniversary of the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor.

All week you’ve heard stories about how that day and the war years that followed it changed life in Hawai‘i….and you’ve heard those stories from the people who lived through those experiences.

Some of those changes had to do with how people of different racial backgrounds interacted with each other.  In 1941, Pearl Johnson lived in O‘ahu’s Pauoa Valley…and she still lives there today.

Wikimedia Commons
Wikimedia Commons

On December 8, 1941, fires still burned in the wreckage of the battleships that lay in the mud of Pearl Harbor while crews in small boats continued the gruesome work of recovering the dead. Hidden amid the smoke, many of the seeds of the eventual American victory. More from Neal Conan, in the Pacific News Minute.

Wikipedia Commons
Wikipedia Commons

The events of December 7th, 1941 were such a massive shock that some parts of the story are sometimes forgotten.  It’s often described as the bombing of Pearl Harbor—and that’s where the bulk of the casualties took place.

But before the ships came the planes.  The Japanese wanted to hit the capacity of US Forces to strike back by air.  And so half a dozen air bases around O‘ahu were strafed and bombed.

AP / US Navy
AP / US Navy

75 years ago, Japan attacked the U.S. Pacific Fleet at Pearl Harbor. The strike killed more than 2,300 people and propelled the United States into World War II. The anniversary brings back memories not just for those in the military but those who lived in Hawaii. Molly Solomon from Hawaii Public Radio brings us some of those voices.

Wikipedia Commons
Wikipedia Commons

Japan’s attack on Pearl Harbor 75 years ago today changed life in the islands—and across the United States.  When Japanese planes were sighted in the skies over Pearl Harbor 75 years ago today, many people thought at first they were simply engaged in military exercises.

Face of the Enemy

Dec 6, 2016
United States War Department (United States National Archives) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons
United States War Department (United States National Archives) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

When Japan bombed Pearl Harbor seventy five years ago, thirty seven percent of Hawai‘i’s population was ethnically Japanese.  Honolulu hummed with Japanese run restaurants, sundry stores, hardware and grocery stores, everyone went to Japanese movies, and Japanese maids and gardeners worked in many wealthy homes.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports on how Japanese and others felt during the period.

John Henry Felix / Twitter
John Henry Felix / Twitter

As you’ve been hearing, this week marks the 75th anniversary of the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor.

All week we’re going to be hearing some remembrances of neighbors who were on O‘ahu that day. As well as others who have ties to the islands.

We begin today with the memories of John Henry Felix…whose family lived in the Punchbowl area of Honolulu.

Later this week we’ll hear from people with memories not only of December 7th, 1941, but also the days and weeks and months that followed that changed Hawai‘i.

U.S. National Archives
U.S. National Archives

The bombing of Pearl Harbor was a turning point for Hawai‘i, but it was also the culmination of decades of militarization on O‘ahu.  At the same time, ethnic Japanese constituted forty percent of Hawai‘i’s population, a fact not lost on Washington, as Japanese armies spread across China and the Pacific.

Wikipedia Commons
Wikipedia Commons

Next Wednesday marks the 75th anniversary of the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. Memorial events are taking place all week, involving a number of organizations. We get more on that part of the story from Pacific Business News Editor in Chief A. Kam Napier.

The Conversation: Monday, May 30th, 2016

May 30, 2016
Flickr - Cold Press Publishing

Off Shore Wind Farm Proposal; Revisiting the Battle of Midway; Building Smart Housing on Oahu; Preserving Historic Pearl Harbor Site

Proposed Wind Farms in Kahuku and off shore: Henry Curtis

Molly Solomon
Molly Solomon

75 years later, a Navy sailor killed in the attack on Pearl Harbor has gotten a proper burial. Petty Officer 1st Class Vernon Luke was laid to rest during a ceremony Wednesday at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific. As HPR’s Molly Solomon reports, he was the first to be reburied out of nearly 400 soldiers who were previously marked as unknowns.

Wayne Yoshioka

Survivors of the Pearl Harbor attack will commemorate the 72nd anniversary of that “Day of Infamy” Sunday Morning.   A number of survivors have been in Honolulu for a couple of weeks volunteering and raising money.   HPR’s Wayne Yoshioka reports …

Wayne Yoshioka
Wayne Yoshioka

The Federal Shutdown hit home this morning, as thousands of federal workers in Hawai’i were put on furlough status, unsure if and when they would be called back to work. HPR’s Wayne Yoshioka visited the state’s largest federal employer, Pearl Harbor.