technology

Ku‘uwehi Hiraishi

A local non-profit is bringing families together with technology. For the tech education organization Purple Maiʻa, you’re never too young or too old to learn to code. HPR's Kuʻuwehi Hiraishi reports.

Wikipedia Commons
Wikipedia Commons

We’ll find out how the State and startup community are looking to leverage tech in the AG sector. We’ll explore how tech can disrupt (improve) the agriculture supply chain from the growing, to storing, to the delivery of product to the market.

Wikimedia Commons
Wikimedia Commons

We’ll explore efforts in workforce development and the IT Works Apprenticeship Initiative. What is the job demand for IT workers, what employers are hiring and how is the apprenticeship program helping?

Wikimedia Commons
Wikimedia Commons

  We’ll explore the intersection of culture, technology and the hackathon. What happens when you immerse the participants in the cultural experience of Aloha ʻĀina and how does this influence technology?

Maurizio Pesce / Flickr
Maurizio Pesce / Flickr

Burt and Ryan explore how new technology can support the tourism industry. From virtual reality to facial-recognition, what tools are the Hawaiʻi Tourism Authority tapping to reach tomorrow's travelers?

youTube Via CC Commons
youTube Via CC Commons

Video conferencing has been around for decades, but its use has exploded in recent years. As the business practice becomes more common, certain challenges have emerged. And one in particular has drawn the attention of a major Asian company. HPR’s Bill Dorman explains in today’s Asia Minute.

Supporters of video conferencing say it can cut business travel expenses and provide better communication than old-fashioned telephone conference calls.  But what if you’re working from home---and you don’t really want to get all gussied up just to stare into a camera on your computer?

www.pexels.com
www.pexels.com

  With the World Conservation Congress in full swing, we’ll find out how the community can get involved in conservation efforts? We’ll explore how projects using smartphones, internet access and data, can assist citizen scientists in finding solutions.

CCTV Screenshot
CCTV Screenshot

The Honolulu Rail project continues to be a focus for this week’s mayoral election on O‘ahu. As cost estimates and other complications rise, a recent transit development from China sounds promising. Or maybe too good to be true. HPR’s Bill Dorman explains in today’s Asia Minute.

Simon Yeo / Flickr
Simon Yeo / Flickr

The tourism industry is always looking for new ideas—whether they involve visitors coming to Hawai‘i or traveling elsewhere in the world.  But a proposal floated this week by a government official in Thailand may not gain a big international following.  HPR’s Bill Dorman explains in today’s Asia Minute.

Thailand wants to track its tourists closely….by way of a computer chip.  A government agency wants all foreign tourists to be issued SIM cards.

Pixabay Commons
Pixabay Commons

The state of Hawaii knows its technology infrastructure is behind the times. Now government officials are reaching out to the tech community for help. Pacific Business News Editor in Chief A. Kam Napier has more.

YouTube Via CC Commons
YouTube Via CC Commons

Travelers to South Korea may soon be getting some help from an unexpected source.  The country’s largest international airport is preparing for some new roles to be played by robots.  HPR’s Bill Dorman has more in today’s Asia Minute.

If you’re wandering around South Korea’s Incheon Airport with travel questions, you may soon be able to get help from a roaming robot.  Cleaning robots are already in use at a number of facilities…including Tokyo’s Haneda Airport.

Coral Surveys 2.0: New Technology Maps Reefs

Jun 23, 2016
XL Catlin Seaview Survey
XL Catlin Seaview Survey

The bigger picture surrounding the state of our reefs just became a bit clearer. New technology and imaging data are helping scientists quickly survey coral reefs from around the world. HPR’s Molly Solomon has more.

Equipped with a 360-degree underwater camera and three powerful processing units, a collaborative research project has become a coral data goldmine.

Wikipedia Commons
Wikipedia Commons

What’s your relationship with your phone? That may seem like an odd question, but it’s one that psychiatrists in South Korea are increasingly asking some of their patients. HPR’s Bill Dorman has details in today’s Asia Minute.

Wikipedia Commons
Wikipedia Commons

How fast is your internet connection? Of all the charms and wonders of Hawai‘i, speedy broadband access doesn’t make the list.  In fact, according to one survey last year, we rank 46th in the country for average speed of connection.  And the latest tech news about Asia makes the comparison even more sobering.  HPR’s Bill Dorman has more in today’s Asia Minute.

Ranking technology use by location can be a tricky business.  Several times a year, various groups report on different measures of technological prowess and adoption.

pixabay.com
pixabay.com

  Today on Bytemarks Café, we'll dive a little deeper into the mind of an entrepreneur. We'll explore the mental health of an entrepreneur and what drives them to risk it all when the odds for success are stacked against them. 

Pixabay Commons
Pixabay Commons

Japan’s largest annual information technology and electronics trade show just wrapped up this weekend outside Tokyo. Of all the gadgets and demonstrations and working models that were on display, there was one in particular that captured the imagination of the crowds….and the attention of the media. HPR’s Bill Dorman has more in today’s Asia Minute.

pixabay.com
pixabay.com

We got an update on several of the key initiatives from the State Department of Business, Economic Development and Tourism. We’ll get the latest on Broadband, the Creative Media industry, Tech and a new educational program developed by Pixar rolling out to the DOE.

New Technology Gives Hope to Epilepsy Patients

Sep 9, 2015
Molly Solomon
Molly Solomon

15,000 people in Hawai‘i currently live with epilepsy. The condition causes recurrent seizures inside the brain, but a new technology is giving hope to patients. HPR’s Molly Solomon reports.

Jesse Cabillon doesn’t remember exactly when the seizures began. That’s because he was six weeks old when his parents first started to notice unusual behavior. "My parents said I would turn to my side and my eyes would roll back," said Jesse, now 30 year-old.

Wikipedia
Wikipedia

There’s a new Science Technology Engineering and Math office at the University of Hawaii. We’ll find out what this office aims to achieve and how it plans to elevate science and technology in Hawaii’s education and economic sectors.

Can Coders Solve Honolulu's Transportation Woes?

May 21, 2015
Flickr / Danielle Scott
Flickr / Danielle Scott

Driving in bumper to bumper traffic is nothing new for residents in Honolulu. When it comes to congested commutes, the city is one of the worst in the country. Now Honolulu officials are turning to the tech community for a solution. HPR’s Molly Solomon explains.

For more information on Reboot the Commute, visit their website. The hackathon kicks off Friday night at ProtoHUB at 6 p.m. Tickets are still available online.

世書 名付 / Flickr
世書 名付 / Flickr

Today, India’s Prime Minister starts his first visit to China since taking office last year.  India and China are the two most populous countries in the world, and they share another characteristic. They’re two of the biggest markets on earth for smart phones. HPR’s Bill Dorman has more in today’s Asia Minute.

Highways England / Flickr
Highways England / Flickr

The University of Hawaii has launched a new mobile app aimed at keeping students safer on campus.  The app is being called "The Manoa Guardian" and allows students to set a timer that notifies a designated contact person or campus security if the user doesn’t check in, or cancel the timer.  Students can also report incidents on campus, alerting security to the time and location of the witness by allowing campus security to respond using the senders GPS location.  Sarah Rice is the Community Programs Manager for the Department of Public Safety for the University of Hawaii at Manoa. 

m01229 / Flickr
m01229 / Flickr

 

 Did you have a restful weekend? According to the Centers for Disease Control, more than a quarter of the U.S. population doesn’t get enough sleep. And new research from Japan shows mobile devices could be keeping people up at night, especially young people. HPR’s Bill Dorman has more in today’s Asia Minute.

Mélissa / Flickr
Mélissa / Flickr

On this Earth Day, it’s timely to note that Hawai‘i has more rooftop solar installations than any other state. The federal Energy Information Administration puts the figure at roughly 12% of the homes across the islands. A different use of solar power will soon be coming to O‘ahu from across the Pacific.  HPR’s Bill Dorman has more in today’s Asia Minute.

catherinecronin / Flickr
catherinecronin / Flickr

The company that owns the rights to the movie “The Dallas Buyers Club” has been fighting illegal downloads of the film. And now that battle has stretched to the Asia Pacific. HPR’s Bill Dorman explains in today’s Asia Minute.

Wikipedia Commons
Wikipedia Commons

Overdoses of prescription drugs are the leading cause of accidental death in Hawai‘i. That’s according to the Hawai‘i Injury Prevention and Control Program and matches a national trend. A team of researchers in Australia is now working on a project that may produce a new generation of pain killers. HPR’s Bill Dorman has more in today’s Asia Minute.

Wikipedia Commons
Wikipedia Commons

The most popular smartphone in China is a brand that may be new to you. A new report says the company beat out Samsung, Apple, and every other smart phone maker when it comes to sales in the world’s most populous country. HPR’s Bill Dorman has more in today’s Asia Minute.

Wikipedia Commons
Wikipedia Commons

  

Broadband internet access is both a luxury for modern entertainment and a necessity for business. But Hawaii is falling behind when it comes to fast connections. We get a look at some of the people and businesses involved from Pacific Business News Editor in Chief A. Kam Napier.

Wikipedia Commons
Wikipedia Commons

The research group E-Marketer estimates about a quarter of the world’s population now use smart phones at least once a month. Cheaper prices have been a big factor in spreading their use. Another study shows that in one digital hot spot, the time spent on those smart phones has also grown dramatically. HPR’s Bill Dorman explains in today’s Asia Minute.

www.popsugar.com
www.popsugar.com

  

Over this holiday season, people are spending some down time with a variety of activities. Around Asia, there’s a growing trend that involves a different kind of relaxation, of a very low-tech variety.  HPR’s Bill Dorman explains in today’s Asia Minute.

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