voyaging

oiwi tv
oiwi tv

Two hundred forty five crewmembers participated onboard the Hōkūle‘a in the Mālama Honua Worldwide Voyage, but many thousands more participated from land, following the voyage online.  Case in point, Vince Farrant, a recent Kamehameha School graduate, who followed the canoe’s progress and met many crewmembers through a Celestial Navigation class at Kamehameha  School.  In HPR's Noe Tanigawa's  interview, he reflects on the significance of this voyage for new generations. 

oiwi tv
oiwi tv

The Hōkūle‘a's Mālama Honua Worldwide Voyage began in 2013 with a sail around the Hawaiian archipelago.  Since then, the Hōkūle‘a and Hikianalia, the Polynesian Voyaging Society’s voyaging canoes have been plying waters across the globe, dodging cyclones and hurricanes, pirates and sandbars to complete their global circuit.  HPR's Noe Tanigawa spoke with crew member Na'alehu Anthony about what he experienced.

noe tanigawa
noe tanigawa

Master carver Kawika Eskaran has built canoes, he’s sailed and works with Polynesian navigators and directs special projects at BYU-Hawai‘i.  His sculpture at the corner of South and Ala Moana is designed to bring peace to an area with a troubled history.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports, it is also a navigational reference, for those who understand.