Waikiki

Hawaii Marine Animal Response
Hawaii Marine Animal Response

One super fun addition to the Waikīkī scene this year was a little Hawaiian Monk Seal pup, who was named for her birthplace, Kaimana.  More than two million followed Kaimana on the live webcam and over a thousand people visited her daily.  Even though the photos many of us took looked like two slugs on a sand lot, the thrill of seeing them in person got us down there time after time.

Karen Neoh / Flickr

Deedy Case Headed for a Third Trial; Waikiki Natatorium; Improving School Bus Efficiency; Global Teacher Prize

SOEST
SOEST

In a continuing discussion about climate change, there are  opportunities and challenges in the year ahead.  Today, HPR’s Noe Tanigawa speaks with Chip Fletcher, Associate Dean at UH Mānoa, and a professor of geology and geophysics.  His research shows water creeping inland and seeping up into neighborhoods sooner than you might think.

Wikimedia Commons

Pearl Harbor Memories; Waikiki Erosion; Wartime Hawaii in Fiction; Farm Equipment Theft

Wikimedia Commons

Big Island Coffee Bean Theft; Increase in Waikiki Violence; Public Sector UnionsMy Mother Said, Watch Out for Those French Girls

Hawaii Marine Animal Response (HMAR).
Hawaii Marine Animal Response (HMAR).

On the Diamond Head end of Waikīkī, crowds of up to a hundred people have been reported along the boundaries set up on Kaimana beach to protect a monk seal and her pup.  The pup, born between June 27 and 28, is growing and getting stronger, prompting new and broader warnings from the Department of Land and Natural Resources.  HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports.

Wayne Yoshioka

Honolulu City Council members were briefed last week on plans to ease parking and delivery congestion in Waikiki.   HPR’s Wayne Yoshioka reports.

OUTRIGGER ENTERPRISES GROUP
OUTRIGGER ENTERPRISES GROUP

The presidential election has dominated the news all week. But there was also a dramatic development this week in Hawai‘i’s visitor industry. Pacific Business News Editor in Chief A. Kam Napier has more on the latest from Outrigger Hotels & Resorts.

Outrigger Hotels Sold

Nov 8, 2016
clohr / Flickr
clohr / Flickr

One of Hawai‘i’s largest hotel chains has been sold.

Outrigger Hotels and Resorts will be purchased by K-S-L Capital Partners—a private equity group. Although terms were not disclosed.  The transaction includes all of Outrigger's hotels, condominiums, and vacation resort properties.

Wayne Yoshioka

Waikiki hotels and timeshares are near or at capacity this year as visitor arrivals climb past the 8-million mark for the entire state.  That opens the door for visitors to seek alternative vacation rentals.  HPR’s Wayne Yoshioka reports.

Nick Yee
Nick Yee

The International marketplace in Waikīkī opens today as a re-imagined shopping mall.

Wikipedia Commons
Wikipedia Commons

What does it take to run the biggest resort in the state? Pacific Business New interviews Debi Bishop to find out. Editor in Chief A. Kam Napier has the story.

In April, Debi Bishop was named managing director of the Hilton Hawaiian Village Waikiki Beach Resort. Not only is it the largest resort in the state, it is also the largest Hilton in the world, by number of guest rooms.  2,860 rooms to be exact, spread among seven towers across 22 acres.  About 3,000 people work at the Hilton Hawaiian village. Bishop is responsible for every facet of the operation.

faerie-angel Via CC Commons
faerie-angel Via CC Commons

In the 1980’s, Japanese investment poured into Hawai‘i—from residential real estate to hotels. Hawai‘i is still a popular destination for Japanese investors…. but they’re increasingly being joined by those from South Korea. HPR’s Bill Dorman has more in today’s Asia minute.

South Korea’s central bank cut interest rates to a record low Thursday…one and a quarter percent.  Those low interest rates at home are one factor driving investment money abroad—including here in Hawai‘i.

Developer, Irongate PACREP, LLC

A luxury condominium-hotel in Waikiki will be opening soon.   But first, the developer must obtain approvals from the city two years after construction started.   HPR’s Wayne Yoshioka reports. 

Wayne Yoshioka

Hawai’i’s $15 billion visitor industry is in the process of diversifying and re-tooling to meet an onslaught of competition from other tourist destinations. HPR’s Wayne Yoshioka reports.    

Communications Pacific

A Honolulu City Council Committee approved a plan to build a second luxury tower in Waikiki today, on the same block that another high-end building is already under construction.   HPR’s Wayne Yoshioka reports.     

Wayne Yoshioka

State Representative Tom Brower created quite a controversy earlier this week with his sledge-hammer attacks on grocery shopping carts in Waikiki as his way to rid the area of homelessness.   The Honolulu City Council has been pursuing another method by creating a new law that would ban lying down on public sidewalks in certain districts.    HPR’s Wayne Yoshioka has been following this story and filed this report. 

Hawaii Aims to Boost Chinese Tourism

Jun 17, 2013
Flickr / rickz
Flickr / rickz

This year, visitors from China became the top source of international tourism for the country. But how many of them are choosing Hawaii as their destination? HPR’s Molly Solomon reports on what the state is doing to attract Asia’s largest economy.

Wayne Yoshioka
Wayne Yoshioka

Administrators and representatives for Public Employee Retirement systems nationwide are in Hawai’i this week for their annual 4-day conference.   And, like so many other gatherings here,  conducting a business conference in Hawaii has come under fire once again in some mainland states.    But, as HPR’s Wayne Yoshioka reports, the Governor was on point and in attack-mode today.  

Local Photographer Turns Lens Toward Waikiki

Oct 17, 2012
Eric Yanagi

Nearly 40 years ago, a 22-year old artist decided to document the changing landscape of Honolulu's most famous neighborhood --- Waikiki.  That artist was local photographer Eric Yanagi.  

Thanks to a state grant, Yanagi completed the year-long project in 1973. His focus was on the community that was living in a rapidly developing Waikiki.  Now he’s compiled a collection of his photographs that are on display at UH Manoa, “Framing Paradise: Photography and Waikiki.”